Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

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For this round of Wanna Know Idaho – we’re headed to the West Central Mountains. Have you ever wondered…

How Cascade Reservoir became Lake Cascade?

Or why the average age of people in the region seems to be higher than in other parts of the state? 

Or maybe you’re wondering about the potential impacts of an open pit mine that's been proposed by the Midas Gold Corp.? 

Ada County Statehouse Capitol Building Secretary of State Denney
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

After more than 100 years of doing things the old-fashioned way, businesses in Idaho can now file reports online.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Depending on where you live in Idaho, you might find that prices at your local gas station are 30-40 cents higher per gallon than in neighboring Wyoming and Montana. So...what’s up with that? 

Lime

Update Wednesday, Oct. 10: The pay-as-you-go scooters from a company called Lime that took over Meridian for a few days won’t be back anytime soon. After debuting on September 27th, all of the scooters were pulled from the streets after a request by Meridian city officials on October 2nd. Now, a representative with Lime says a rollout of the conveyances is suspended until March of 2019.

The Idaho Press reports that in the interim, the company will launch an education campaign to show residents how to use the scooters. Lime is staying tight lipped on just how many scooters will go on the road in March.

While Meridian pauses its relationship with Lime, the City of Boise is in talks with the scooter purveyor and a rival. The Statesman reports the city is taking its time as it irons out rules for bike and scooter share companies. Boise Administrative Services Manager Craig Croner says scooters could be on the streets in the capital by the end of the month.

Update Wednesday, Oct. 3: At a Meridian city council meeting Tuesday, the city requested Lime to put the scooters on hold until more discussion can take place about the future of the scooters. Over the weekend, before a hold was put on Lime’s services in Meridian, Lime reduced the number of scooters from 200 to 100. 

 

Original post Friday Sept. 28: The California company Lime has brought their electric scooters to Meridian. Called Lime-S scooters, the devices cost $1 to unlock and 15 cents per minute of riding. But unlike some programs around the country that rely on centralized stations where the scooters are locked to metal racks, these scooters will be dockless.

Tom Williams / AP

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo questioned Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh Thursday afternoon during a marathon hearing.

Greg Harness / Flickr Creative Commons

Prescribed burning is an important tool in a wildland firefighter’s toolbox. Crews will go out and light fires in areas that maybe haven’t burned naturally in decades.

 

Talo Pinto / Flickr Creative Commons

Officials from Ketchum and Sun Valley are again weighing a possible consolidation of their fire departments. During a listening session last week, the Sun Valley Director of Public Safety presented a report outlining the pros and cons of combining the resources.

Tim Henshall / Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Boise has joined a growing list of cities across the country that have committed to transitioning to 100 percent renewable energy sources.

 

 

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

An Idaho and Oregon senator are considering changes to how rural schools are funded.

Otto Kitsinger / AP Images

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Paulette Jordan has lost another two key members of her campaign team just two months before the election.

Update -- This voting round has closed. The winning question: "What about the prices we pay at the pump: Why does it seem like the price of gas is higher in the Gem State than in surrounding states?" Be sure to subscribe to the podcast here!

Boise River Nature Outdoors Water
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Lauren Zinsser keeps tabs on the health of the Boise River, from Lucky Peak to Parma.

via Google Maps

The Jerome-based company Capps Inc. has applied to increase the truck load weight on the 40-mile stretch from Shoshone to Airport Way in Hailey. The company hauls grain, compost, hay and straw between farms in the Magic and Wood River Valleys.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

August in Idaho means the last month of summer vacation, county fairs, camping and … oh yeah, wildfires. Here's just a few of the wildfire stories Boise State Public Radio covered this month.

Lost Grove Brewery / via Facebook

Water is one of the key ingredients in craft beer – and it’s used a lot throughout the entire craft brewing process. But what if there were a way to recycle wastewater and turn it into beer?

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