Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

Chadd Cripe / Idaho Statesman

A group of state lawmakers is asking Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter to call a special legislative session to support a potential deal on water rights in southwest Idaho.

Jimmy Emerson / Flickr Creative Commons

Last year, the cold and wet winter evolved into a cold and wet spring, presenting a swath of challenges for producers. But milder conditions have prevailed so far this season. According to the Capital Press, growers from Nyssa to New Plymouth are reporting a good start to the summer.

sagebrush, sage grouse
Bureau of Land Management

Federal officials have approved a project that aims to help the iconic sage grouse in southwest Idaho. The threat? An encroaching evergreen that has infiltrated much of the region's sage brush steppe.

 

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Legislative leaders say Gov. Butch Otter might call a special legislative session to address a years-long water battle that has been building in southwestern Idaho.

Idaho Parks and Recreation

If you were hoping to snag a last-minute camping spot for Memorial Day weekend, you’ll have to look beyond Idaho’s many state parks.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise's new orange bag recycling program asks customers who live in residential buildings with fewer than eight units to sort their recyclables, after 10 years of a simpler mixed recycling service.

Idaho Department of Water Resources

It’s been a year of good news for the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer recharge program. The aquifer – which serves southern Idaho’s agricultural-rich Magic Valley and about 200,000 homes – is the subject of a strategic recharge project. 

John / Flickr Creative Commons

Only Congress can create wilderness areas, which have tight land use restrictions. Sen. Jim Risch introduced legislation to protect about 14,000 acres of rugged mountain terrain at Scotchman Peaks in 2016.

screenshot / Bureau of Land Management

The Bureau of Land Management has launched a new website meant to make wild horse adoption easier. It has several streamlined search functions, allowing you to select the price range, age, gender and even location of wild horses currently waiting to be adopted.


Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

When China put a ban on plastics at the beginning of the year, it sent shockwaves through the global recycling market. Cities across Idaho and the country have been struggling to find a new use for their recycled material.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Two of the most bruising Republican primaries last night were the gubernatorial race and the battle for Idaho’s First Congressional District.

Idaho Department of Lands

Bark beetles are tiny insects that both thrive on – and contribute to – wildfires. Idaho forest managers are making use of a natural chemical the beetles produce to protect against further damage.

Bureau of Land Management

Last June, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke opened federal sage grouse management plans approved in 2015 to state scrutiny.

Steve Pankey / via Facebook

Steve Pankey first ran for governor of Idaho in 2014 and received less than 2 percent of the vote. At the time, he was in the Constitution party, but now he's running as a Republican.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

It’s been nine months since Cecil Andrus died. The four-term Idaho governor and Secretary of the Interior for the Carter Administration has numerous Idaho institutions named after him, including an elementary school, a plant and a wilderness area. Now, a city park in Boise bears his name.

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