James Dawson

News Director

James Dawson joined Boise State Public Radio as the organization's News Director in 2017. He oversees the station's award-winning news department. 

Most recently, he covered state politics and government for Delaware Public Media since the station first began broadcasting in 2012 as the country's newest NPR affiliate. Those reports spanned two governors, three sessions of the Delaware General Assembly, and three consequential elections. His work has been featured on All Things Considered and NPR's newscast division. 

An Idaho native from north of the time zone bridge, James previously served as the public affairs reporter and interim news director for the commercial radio network Inland Northwest Broadcasting. His reporting experience included state and local government, arts and culture, crime, and agriculture.

He's a proud University of Idaho graduate with a bachelor's degree in Broadcasting and Digital Media. When he's not in the office, you can find James fly fishing, buffing up on his photography or watching the Seattle Mariners' latest rebuilding season.

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

As part of our coverage of the 2018 election, we’re bringing you conversations with each of the candidates running for governor who face a primary challenge.

James Dawson spoke with Peter Dill, a business attorney and organic farmer from Emmett, who's seeking his first political office.


vote, election
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Mountains of cash are punctuating Idaho’s gubernatorial primary election with just a week to go before voters head to the polls.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

As part of our coverage of the 2018 election, we’re bringing you conversations with each of the candidates running for governor who face a primary challenge.

 

James Dawson spoke with Congressman Raul Labrador, a longtime Idaho politician who has represented the state's 1st Congressional District since 2012.

 

On addressing the estimated 62,000 people stuck in the so-called Medicaid gap:

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Idaho State University is facing a federal fine after losing a sample of radioactive plutonium.

Oregon Historical Society

Idaho: a lot of us live here, but how many of us know the origin of the word itself?

James Dawson

Backers of a ballot initiative to force Idaho to expand Medicaid eligibility to low income individuals say they’ve turned in enough signatures to put the question to voters, though they still need to be validated.

screengrab google.com/maps

Homeowners who were forced to evacuate their Boise Foothills houses two years ago after a landslide will split more than a quarter of a million dollars after settling a lawsuit with the city.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

After nearly two years, homeowners have settled out of court with the city of Boise after part of a subdivision in the foothills was damaged by a landslide.

James Dawson

The campaign to ask Idaho voters whether they want to expand Medicaid eligibility says it’s met a significant milestone.

Mike Mozart, Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho’s unemployment rate ticked down again last month, reaching lows the state hasn’t seen for more than a decade.

University of Idaho, College of Agricultural & Life Sciences / Facebook

It’s going to cost you more to attend many public Idaho colleges or universities next year.

Scott Ki

As spring turns the Boise foothills green, thousands of sheep begin their biannual grazing journey eastward.

Courtesy of Colegio San Antonio Abad

Recovery from a powerful hurricane continues in Puerto Rico about seven months after it hit the island. In September, Hurricane Maria slammed into the U.S. territory, causing an estimated $90 billion in damage, according to federal officials.

Capitol, US Capitol, Congress
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Significant cash is flowing into Idaho’s first congressional district in the race to replace outgoing U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador.

 

James Dawson

This weekend, Idaho’s leading Republican candidates for governor jabbed at each other at one of the first debates of the season, each promising they’re the most qualified to lead Idaho into the future.

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