James Dawson

News Director

James Dawson joined Boise State Public Radio as the organization's News Director in 2017. He oversees the station's award-winning news department. 

Most recently, he covered state politics and government for Delaware Public Media since the station first began broadcasting in 2012 as the country's newest NPR affiliate. Those reports spanned two governors, three sessions of the Delaware General Assembly, and three consequential elections. His work has been featured on All Things Considered and NPR's newscast division. 

An Idaho native from north of the time zone bridge, James previously served as the public affairs reporter and interim news director for the commercial radio network Inland Northwest Broadcasting. His reporting experience included state and local government, arts and culture, crime, and agriculture.

He's a proud University of Idaho graduate with a bachelor's degree in Broadcasting and Digital Media. When he's not in the office, you can find James fly fishing, buffing up on his photography or watching the Seattle Mariners' latest rebuilding season.

Zach Dischner via Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Boise will soon marry two of its residents’ favorite passions: mountain bikes and dogs.

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s legislative leaders say more needs be done to help prevent school shootings, bucking comments made last month by Gov. Butch Otter.

Ronda Churchill / AP

West Ada, poised to be one of the largest school districts in the nation, will add a sixth high school after voters approved a $95 million bond Tuesday night.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Monday, Idaho House lawmakers overwhelmingly approved a bill that would give judges more leeway in handing down sentences in drug trafficking cases.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

After hours of testimony and a split vote, Idaho House lawmakers will consider a bill giving judges more discretion in how to sentence alleged drug traffickers.

 

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

State Representatives fell five votes shy of expanding the rights of crime victims in the Idaho Constitution Monday.

hand gun
Stephen Velasco / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Republican senators have signed off on a bill that would expand legal cover for those who hurt or kill someone in self-defense.

 

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Despite a handful competing tax bills, Gov. Butch Otter will get his $200 million tax cut proposal after all following a two-hour debate by Idaho senators.

 

James Dawson

It’s a brisk afternoon in January as canvassers hit Boise’s North End. Their goal? Roughly 56,000 signatures to expand access to Medicaid in Idaho.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

An Idaho House panel has advanced a proposed amendment to the state's constitution to expand the rights of crime victims and their families.

M&R Glasgow / Flickr.com

An Idaho senate committee gave the green light Monday to a bill that would add extra protections for those who harm or kill someone in self-defense.

Idaho Capitol Dome
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

An Idaho Senate panel voted to retain all references to man-made climate change in proposed science standards for K-12 education, which could end a three-year fight over the rules.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Idaho Sen. Jim Risch (R) will be at the closing Olympic ceremony this Sunday, despite his recent comments on North Korea.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Republican state senators have signed off on a bill along party lines that would require medical providers to tell patients they may be able to reverse a chemical abortion if they change their mind.

AP Photo

During a wide-reaching press conference Thursday, Governor Butch Otter (R) defended the involvement of Lieutenant Governor Brad Little (R) in allowing insurance companies to offer plans that don’t comply with federal law.

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