Matt Guilhem

Morning Edition Host/News Reporter

Matt Guilhem is the Morning Edition host and a reporter for Boise State Public Radio. He came to Idaho by way of southern California where he was a reporter and host for the NPR affiliate in the Inland Empire region.

 His reporting has been heard on NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now. During the December 2ndterror attack in San Bernardino, Matt was the first reporter on the scene for NPR. This year, he's one of about 25 reporters from California to be a 2016 Reporting on Health Fellow through USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

 Matt got into radio while getting his master's degree abroad at the London School of Economics; he hosted a weekly talk show and immediately knew radio was something he wanted to pursue. After returning to southern California from London, he started volunteering at his local NPR station and eventually was hired. He earned his B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley.
 

When he's not behind a microphone, he's probably out exploring Idaho or pretending to be a mixologist.

Kjetil Korslien / Flickr

Madison County in eastern Idaho is still reeling from a cyber attack over the weekend. The hackers put ransomware into Madison County’s computer system.

Omar Barcena / Flickr

Despite repeated attempts to cut wait times at Idaho DMVs and to fix an unstable computer system, long lines and closures are still delaying drivers.


Bart / Flickr

A new veteran’s cemetery is coming to the Gem State. The facility in the eastern part of the state will be Idaho’s third burial ground for those who served in the armed forces.


Sigma Pi Sigma National Office / Flickr

A famous experimental physicist who lived in eastern Idaho has died. Leon Lederman was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on subatomic particles.


Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Both the Republican and Democrat running to be Idaho’s next governor appeared Tuesday night for a conversation at the College Of Idaho.


Boise State Public Radio

Idaho and Mississippi are in the crosshairs of scammers.

State authorities are warning residents to be wary when giving out their personal information to anyone calling and offering to register them to vote.


David Chilstrom / Flickr

The U.S. and Canada reached an eleventh hour deal over the weekend for a tentative replacement of NAFTA. One of the biggest sticking points was access to the Canadian dairy market.


Dank Depot / Flickr

Marijuana dispensaries could soon be coming to Ontario, Oregon – right in the Treasure Valley’s backyard. Now, a pot shop might be coming in the orbit of the Magic Valley.


Lime

Update Wednesday, Oct. 10: The pay-as-you-go scooters from a company called Lime that took over Meridian for a few days won’t be back anytime soon. After debuting on September 27th, all of the scooters were pulled from the streets after a request by Meridian city officials on October 2nd. Now, a representative with Lime says a rollout of the conveyances is suspended until March of 2019.

The Idaho Press reports that in the interim, the company will launch an education campaign to show residents how to use the scooters. Lime is staying tight lipped on just how many scooters will go on the road in March.

While Meridian pauses its relationship with Lime, the City of Boise is in talks with the scooter purveyor and a rival. The Statesman reports the city is taking its time as it irons out rules for bike and scooter share companies. Boise Administrative Services Manager Craig Croner says scooters could be on the streets in the capital by the end of the month.

Update Wednesday, Oct. 3: At a Meridian city council meeting Tuesday, the city requested Lime to put the scooters on hold until more discussion can take place about the future of the scooters. Over the weekend, before a hold was put on Lime’s services in Meridian, Lime reduced the number of scooters from 200 to 100. 

 

Original post Friday Sept. 28: The California company Lime has brought their electric scooters to Meridian. Called Lime-S scooters, the devices cost $1 to unlock and 15 cents per minute of riding. But unlike some programs around the country that rely on centralized stations where the scooters are locked to metal racks, these scooters will be dockless.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The backers of Proposition 1, the initiative to reauthorize historical horse racing in Idaho, announced a new charitable initiative at Boise’s Les Bois Park Thursday, September 27.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

In November, Idaho voters will head to the polls to decide on whether or not Medicaid coverage should be expanded to include some 51,000 people who currently don’t qualify. Despite his party opposing the proposition, Republican gubernatorial candidate Brad Little says he’ll enforce the will of the people.

Stephen Downes / Flickr

A Utah-based developer is looking to build an industrial park in the southeast of Boise near the sprawling Micron campus. The region is already home to several distribution centers, but area residents worry this proposed development could impact their quality of life.

Jarkko J / Flickr

The city of Nampa is bracing for what’s become something of an avian invasion. Thousands of crows will soon visit the Treasure Valley city and bring a mess of feathers and droppings. Nampa is trying to get ahead of the influx by building a volunteer corps.


Planned Parenthood of the Northwest

Lawyers sparred Monday, September 17 over an abortion reporting law that passed earlier this year and went into effect July 1. It mandates health providers hand over information to the state about women receiving abortions – including if they have any of 37 so-called complications named in the law.

Brett Whaley / Flickr

The case of a Preston science teacher who allegedly fed a live puppy to a snapping turtle got international attention. The eastern Idaho town is bracing for a trial next month.


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