Enthusiasm High As Idaho Votes

Nov 6, 2018

People across Idaho are casting ballots today for a new governor, two big propositions and a host of local races. Reporters Matt Guilhem and Roam Yocham went to polling places in Ada County and spoke to voters Tuesday morning and into the afternoon.

There’s no line of voters out the door at one polling place in Boise's North End Tuesday morning, but the stream of people in and out is consistent. Pushing a stroller and with a labradoodle on a leash, Kevin Bean walks up to vote. While a progressive, he questions the impact of voting for Democrats in Idaho.

“There’s a little bit at stake,” says Bean. “Today’s more of a national thing. [In] Idaho everything is kind of already chosen for you, I feel like.”

Mirroring Bean’s frustration is Reid Tokarz. The IT consultant wearing a maroon hoodie says he’s frustrated with each party.

“I think the puritanism on both sides is just so stupid, and in Idaho that’s very pronounced,” Tokarz says. “You have to pick a side versus having a reasonable spot to land in the middle.”

Among those casting ballots here are Adam and Audrey Schwind. The young couple say they’re excited to vote.

“I’ve definitely felt a lot of people energized, particularly our friend groups – seems like a higher stakes midterm election,” says Audrey Schwind. Her husband Adam agrees. “I think we thought back to that day after the election in 2016 and that’s been motivating for us,” he says.

The enthusiasm to vote is echoed by plasma center manager Alex Gruell.

“All my friends have been talking about how much they’re going to vote,” says Gruell. “One of my friends, today is her birthday, she just said, ‘All I want for my birthday is for you guys to go vote.’”

At the CityHope Church in West Boise, Rowan and Morgan Gazaway say one thing in particular brought them to the polls today. 

“Just Prop 2 is the biggest one. The expanded healthcare, bringing it back," Rowan Gazaway says. “I agree with him mostly, that’s why I came here," says Morgan Gazaway.

Shawn and Denise Bowlin were impressed by their experience, and didn’t deal with any lines while casting their ballot. 

"It went really fast! I was surprised, I think we were in an out in 10 minutes," says Denise Bowlin. “It was great.” 

Frank Nichols chose to exercise his right to vote in order to support Lt. Gov. Brad Little, the Republican candidate for the state’s highest office. 

"Because, he is a Republican. Bottom Line.”

More than 840,000 people have registered to vote for the midterms in Idaho.  

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