Affordable Housing

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

In December of 2015, the City of Boise shut down a tent camp for people experiencing homelessness called Cooper Court. Since then, the city has moved towards a “housing-first” model to combat homelessness and, as a result, a new housing project will open this October.

Metro Community Services

Homebuyers are looking for something more practical than the 'McMansions' of the 2000s and tiny houses seem to be a viable solution to urban/suburban housing crunches. Small on the outside, roomy on the inside, affordable with a minimal carbon footprint, these houses are becoming the preferred option in growing communities like Boise's. We look at this trend and talk about a group of high school students who built a tiny house for a good cause with Matt Jones of Metro Community Services.

DARIN OSWALD / IDAHO STATESMAN

IndieDwell is repurposing shipping containers into habitable homes for a fraction of the price of a traditional brick-and-mortar home and they leave a substantially smaller environmental footprint. Could shipping containers help solve the pending housing crunch facing the Treasure Valley?

NeighborWorks Boise

A planned block of new homes in the Treasure Valley is attracting buyers before the foundations are even laid.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

You've seen those large metal boxes atop truck trailers. They're used to ship goods from distant seaports to local warehouses while remaining in the same container. Now a Boise home builder says they could be one solution to the shortage of low-income housing.

billandkent / Flickr Creative Commons

Boise Weekly reports McCall is facing a shortage of seasonal workers to staff its hotels and restaurants this summer.

via ARCH Community Housing Trust

 

The Hailey Planning and Zoning Commission has approved the construction of an eight-unit apartment complex to be built in the Woodside subdivision. The Wood River Valley has suffered in recent years for its lack of affordable housing.

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

You have to make nearly twice the state’s minimum wage of $7.25 an hour to afford a two-bedroom apartment in Idaho. It’s more than double the minimum wage if you want to rent in Ada or Canyon counties and closer to triple for Blaine County. That’s from a study out last week from the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

Why Boise Helped Pay For New Low-Income Senior Housing

May 13, 2016
Idaho Housing and Finance Association Facebook page

The City of Boise Thursday celebrated the opening of a new apartment complex for low-income seniors. It’s called the Vineyard at Eagle Promenade, though it’s actually in Boise just across the road from Eagle. The City of Boise helped pay for the 30-unit project along with several partners, including the Idaho Housing and Finance association and New Beginnings Housing which has other low-income housing in Nampa, Caldwell and Hailey.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A developer broke ground Wednesday on a new upscale apartment building in downtown Boise. If it feels like you’ve seen a lot of these lately, you’re not imagining things. Ada County is in the middle of an unprecedented apartment building boom.

Consider a spot in southwest Boise where workers are putting siding on one of several buildings in a new apartment complex called the Asheville. They’re bundled up because the temperature is hovering right at freezing. But it’s blessedly warm inside one of the units that’s already finished.

Chris / Flickr Creative Commons

The rising cost of rental housing is a story being played out in cities across the country. In Idaho, the affordable housing crisis in Boise has been well documented.

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

After years of losing money on his east Boise rental property, things are now changing for Kelley Creamer.

Creamer owns a small two-bedroom home that he and his wife bought in 2004. They fixed it up with high-end kitchen appliances, cabinets and granite countertops. They lived in the house until they purchased another home and moved into it. 

It was 2010 and Boise was still suffering from the effects of the housing downturn. Creamer says had the couple sold their first home, they would’ve lost around $20,000.