Arts & Culture

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

A one-of-a-kind house sits on what was once a barren promontory in Idaho’s Hagerman Valley. In the mid-1950s, landscape painter Archie Teater and his wife commissioned arguably the world’s most famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, to design a studio for them. 


Portrait photographers working in the region have been getting reminders lately of a federal rule that they need permits to shoot on forest service land.

Expressive Idaho: Indian Dancing In Boise

Jul 31, 2018
Olivia Weitz / Idaho Commission on the Arts

Performers of Indian dance often rely on dramatic facial expressions and hand gestures to entertain and tell stories. Their bright costumes and eye makeup may stand out the most for those who are unfamiliar with the South Asian art form, or have glimpsed it only in Bollywood films. But those expressions and gestures are rooted in ancient Indian folk dance and classical forms like Bharatanatyam: a dance with spiritual qualities that has been performed in South Indian temples for centuries.

She's a former journalist, who wrote books on the side, until she took the plunge to become a full-time writer in 2015. Now Brenda Stanley is an author with eight books to her credit. When her novel, "The Color of Snow" did well, she decided to quit her job in journalism and focus on writing. Her latest book, "The Treasure of Cedar Creek" is a mystery/thriller, set in the Idaho wilderness.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The world's most recognizable food-shaped motor vehicle rolled into Boise this week and we speak with the "Hot-doggers" who pilot the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile across the country.

Brian Bielmann

'Andy Irons: Kissed By God' tells the story of one of the greatest surfers in history, a kid who grew up on the North Shore of Kauai and was touring the globe in his teens.

Idaho Public Television

Idaho Experience is Idaho Public Television's new series bringing to life the stories of the extraordinary people and defining events that have shaped Idaho's past and present.

Credit: boisegoatheadfest.com

Boise bicyclists were disappointed to hear the "Tour de Fat" bike festival would not be returning this year, so area organizers put together their own festival. We speak with Jimmy Hallyburton, Executive Director of the Boise Bicycle Project, about the upcoming Goat Head Fest.

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

It’s been nearly a month after a mass stabbing in Boise left one child dead and eight other people hospitalized – all of them refugees. Now, the city’s arts community is adding its voice to those supporting the victims.

SADIE BABITS

The San Inazio Festival is an annual event to honor St. Ignatius of Loyola, the patron saint of the Basques. It began more than 25 years ago and now thousands come to the Basque Block at the end of every July to see local musicians and dancers as well as Basque sporting events.

ebay

The bitter Italian cordial Aperol is in short supply and area bartenders and cocktail entusiasts want to know why the popular summer spritzer liquor is so hard to find. On Monday's Idaho Matters, we ask a Boise mixologist why.

Richard Lane, 1969/Courtesy Basque Library at the University of Nevada, Reno

In the 1930s and 40s, hundreds of Basque people were brought to the western United States to do the desolate work that no one else would do—herding sheep. Alone for months at a time with hundreds of sheep, the Basque improvised songs, baked bread in underground ovens, carved poetry and drawings into the Aspen trees, listened to The Basque Radio hour traditional music and messages between the herders out in the isolated countryside—looking forward to The Annual Sheepherder’s Ball.

LDS.ORG

A 2017 report from the Public Religion Research Institute indicated the number of Americans who identify as Christians has been in a steady decline, while people who identify as members of the Church of Latter Day Saints has increased steadily. We look at how the Mormon church is bucking the trend of declining religious affiliation.

Adam Theo / Flickr

One Idaho professor is on the hunt for two lost novels written by one of America's seminal poets, which may have been hidden for more than 100 years.

FPG/Getty Images

Walt Whitman's works have been analyzed by scholars since his passing in 1892 and University of Idaho American literature assistant professor Zachery Turpin is digging through archives and manuscripts in search of Whitman's "lost" works.  Turpin joins us to talk about his quest for literature's "National Treasure."

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