Boise

JAMES DAWSON / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

On a Saturday night, the last night in June, a group of families, who had found refuge in Boise, were gathered to celebrate a child's birthday.  A man - a transient with an extensive record who had been staying at the apartment complex - entered the party and stabbed at everyone in attendance. By the time it was over, nine people - children and adults - had been stabbed. The three-year-old birthday girl passed away days later. We look at how that community is coping with this tragedy and how they'll move forward in this community.

wkow-abc7/Credit: Tyler Harbick/Courtesy of Zack Young/NBC 5, Dallas-Fort Worth

Five different dockless bike share companies have set up shop in Dallas in the last year. In a matter of weeks, three shuttered and left town, leaving behind nearly 20,000 unused bicycles. We speak with a Dallas reporter who covered the rise and fall of Dallas' bike share industry and David Fotsch, director of Boise Green Bike about the lessons that can be learned from this.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Plans for a new downtown library in Boise are developing, and they could bring changes to the entire neighborhood. An old warehouse that’s been the home of Foothills School of Arts and Sciences for more than 20 years will likely meet the wrecking ball. Both the owner of the property and the school say they’ve been exploring their options.


  • How refugee families are coping with June assault
  • Lessons learned from Dallas bike share failures
  • Reducing child abuse with the Idaho Children's Trust Fund/Prevent Child Abuse Idaho
  • Students compete in Science Olympiad

boisegoatheadfest.com

The first Boise Goathead Fest wrapped up on Saturday and we get the recap from organizer Jimmy Hallyburton.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The clock is ticking to save a historic home just east of downtown Boise. The city has put a 182-day moratorium in place preventing demolition or alteration of the stately house on West Main Street.

  • Kevin Richert recaps last week's State Superintendent debate
  • The BLM describes how recreational shooting can cause wildfires
  • Dogs fly into Boise for adoption
  • A look at the first Goathead Fest

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

In December of 2015, the City of Boise shut down a tent camp for people experiencing homelessness called Cooper Court. Since then, the city has moved towards a “housing-first” model to combat homelessness and, as a result, a new housing project will open this October.

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

We assemble a panel of Idaho journalists to discuss the week's events in Boise, the Treasure Valley and beyond. This week we're joined by Bill Manny from the Idaho Statesman, and Betsy Russell and Scott McIntosh from the Idaho Press. We cover all the week's topics, even escaping goats!

Adele Booysen / Flickr

The city of Boise’s program doling out compost for free to residents who want it has exceeded expectations in its first year.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Artist James Castle's family home has been turned into a museum, shop and a space for an artist in residence. The first such artist, Keiran Brennan Hinton, moved in in May. We chat with him about observational painting.

SamPac / Flickr

Many of our veterans come home from active military service to find a lack of resources to help them get settled back into civilian life. As rental prices soar, many veterans are on the verge of homelessness. We take a look at a new initiative that the City of Boise is putting together to find permanent housing for vets.

  • Idaho Matters looks at veterans and the need for housing.
  • “Can Gen X Women Love Their Bodies?”

We assemble a panel of Idaho journalists to discuss the week's events in Boise, the Treasure Valley and beyond. This week we're joined by Kimberlee Kruesi of the Associated Press, Kevin Richert of Idaho Education News and Sven Berg from the Idaho Statesman.

Credit: boisegoatheadfest.com

Boise bicyclists were disappointed to hear the "Tour de Fat" bike festival would not be returning this year, so area organizers put together their own festival. We speak with Jimmy Hallyburton, Executive Director of the Boise Bicycle Project, about the upcoming Goat Head Fest.

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