Boise Rescue Mission

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Officials who provide services to homeless people in the Treasure Valley say folks are falling into a crack in the system. People can’t stay at a shelter if they have a contagious illness. But there may be a solution.

CREDIT COURTESY BOISE RESCUE MISSION

The combination of rising housing rates and increased drug abuse has facilitated growth in the area's homeless population and a greater need for healthcare services. We look at providing medical services for homeless Idahoans with representatives from Interfaith Sanctuary and the Boise Rescue Mission.

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Matthew Mead / AP Images

At this time of year, the culinary arts students at the Centennial Job Corps Center in Nampa usually turn their attention to turkey. Hundreds of the birds are cooked in the center’s production kitchen – along with stuffing and potatoes – and are stored until the Boise Rescue Mission’s annual banquet. The meal serves up to 4,000 people.

facebook.com/boiserescuemission

The Boise Rescue Mission is experiencing a financial crisis. The Christian organization’s leaders say it’s not because of lack of generosity from the community.

 The Rescue Mission has two homeless shelters in Boise and two in Nampa. Holiday contributions are important for keeping those shelters open. And direct mailing is the key to bringing that money in. So when a piece of holiday mail just didn’t get sent last year, CEO Bill Roscoe says the mission was hit hard.