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At least one member of Idaho's entirely Republican congressional delegation is getting flustered by the controversies swirling around the Trump White House. Representative Mike Simpson isn’t mincing words in a recent Politico article.

Cathleen Allison / AP Photo

Congressional Republicans are moving forward with legislation to roll back the Endangered Species Act, amid complaints that the landmark 44-year-old law hinders drilling, logging and other activities.

At simultaneous hearings Wednesday, House and Senate committees considered bills to revise the law and limit lengthy and costly litigation associated with it.

Butch Otter
Idaho Statesman

Governor Butch Otter and state Attorney General Lawrence Wasden are threatening to sue the Trump Administration if it doesn’t abolish a holdover policy from former President Obama.

This week, the Idaho leaders joined nine other attorneys general from Republican-led states who want to curtail the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The program protects some undocumented people from deportation who were brought to the country when they were small children.

sheep, pasture, barn
Heidi Schuyt / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson will try to keep open an Idaho sheep experiment station despite President Donald Trump's proposed budget calling for its elimination.

The Post-Register reported Tuesday that Clark County economic development officials worry closure of the station could have a major negative impact on the economy.

The U.S. Sheep Experiment Station employs 14 full-time researchers. It's one of the most significant employers in the county that about 860 people live in.

Washington Post screenshot / YouTube

A judge said Thursday that he won't allow lawyers for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl to ask potential military jurors whether they voted for President Donald Trump as the defense seeks signs of bias against their client.

The judge, Col. Jeffery Nance, is allowing the defense to ask prospective panel members other questions about whether they were influenced by negative comments Trump made about Bergdahl. But Nance said at a pretrial hearing that a written questionnaire couldn't ask directly how they voted.

Idaho Reps Oppose Trump Restrictions On Cuban Trade

Jun 16, 2017
Ramon Espinosa / AP

 

Friday, President Trump announced a rollback of some Obama-era policy initiatives between the United States and Cuba. Two Idaho State Representatives oppose the move.

Idaho Representatives Mat Erpelding and Luke Malek released a statement condemning the potential implications of further restrictions with Cuba.  

In the statement, they said the move would be “a missed opportunity for the country and a substantive blow to potentially lucrative markets here in Idaho.”

 

Adam Perkins / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. and China signed a trade deal Monday to open the Asian market to American beef. The Chinese market has been off-limits to American ranchers since 2003 after a mad cow disease scare.

Cameron Mulrony is with the Idaho Cattle Association, and says having exports to China is a big deal.  

“The Chinese is a growing market, it’s a large market," says Mulrony. "And those people are traveling and have the taste for U.S. beef so we’re hopefully optimistic that that in turn will give us a boost in our market.”

Climate March
Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

This past winter Southern Idaho experienced one of its snowiest and coldest on record. So we can’t be blamed for wanting to look ahead into the summer. But one organization wants us to look back again.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

During Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue's visit to Idaho last week, the Trump administration official met with state leaders on a range of issues. He took a tour of the state Capitol in Boise alongside Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, and met with dairy producers and other agriculture leaders.

 

Perdue told reporters later on Friday the question of what to do about undocumented workers who fill agriculture jobs across the country is something he has talked with President Trump about often.

Bureau of Land Management

President Donald Trump’s budget request, released this week, includes a provision changing how the Bureau of Land Management manages wild mustangs in the West.

Both the BLM and its detractors agree there are too many wild horses on the landscape. Erin Curtis is the Deputy State Director of Communications for BLM Idaho.

“We cannot keep up with what’s happening out on the range and overpopulation,” says Curtis.

Don Ryan / AP Photo

Tucked into President Donald Trump’s new budget, which was released Tuesday, is a proposal for the government to sell off power lines that deliver electricity to Idaho.

The budget summary says the government could make $4.9 billion by selling the Bonneville Power Administration’s transmission assets over a 10-year period. Around $1.8 billion of that could come in two years.

As Donald Trump continues on his first major foreign trip as President, statesmanship is in the spotlight. Today we speak with a former State Department official about this moment in U.S. diplomacy.

Steve Feldstein  is joining Boise State University to teach in the School of Public Service. In this audio clip, Tom Michael of KBSX News begins by asking him what he thinks of the new Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson.

Jamie Richmond

When news broke that President Trump revealed classified information to Russian officials visiting the White House last week, many in Washington expressed concern. Senator Jim Risch of Idaho, however, was one of the first to make public statements in defense of Trump. This afternoon, a small group of protesters, about 54 of them, gathered outside Risch’s Boise office in opposition.

Risch, a member of the Senate Intelligence and Foreign Relations committees, said Trump’s move to declassify state secrets was completely within his right as President, as he told PBS.

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

U.S. Congressman Mike Simpson says he’s inclined to believe former FBI Director James Comey over President Donald Trump. The comments come in the wake of new details emerging about the investigation of Michael Flynn.

Speaking to reporters this week, Simpson says he’s afraid members of the GOP aren't doing enough to head off a possible crisis similar to Watergate.

Office of Idaho Senator Mike Crapo

The Trump administration on Monday named 10 judges and other law professionals it plans to nominate for key posts as President Donald Trump works to place more conservatives on the nation's federal courts.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said that among the candidates are individuals previously named on Trump's list of 21 possible picks for Supreme Court justice. All nominees would require Senate confirmation.

The announcement came less than a month after Trump's pick for the Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, was confirmed, restoring the court's conservative tilt.

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