The Flicks

AMYPENCEBROWN.COM/CONSPIRE PHOTOGRAPHY

This interview was originally broadcast Tuesday, May 22, 2018.

The documentary Fattitude debuts in Boise on May 30; the picture celebrates body positivity and points out the societal inequities and stereotypes faced by overweight people. The webpage shares facts like "fat people are paid $1.25 less an hour than their thin counterparts" and "one in three doctors associate fat bodies with hostility, dishonesty and poor hygiene."

idaho48.org

The i48 Film Festival is a competition that has filmmakers use only 48 hours to write, pre-produce, cast, shoot and edit an original short film three to six minutes long. The festival, now in its 14th year, will take place at The Flicks this Saturday and we speak with festival co-director Andrew Ellis about what makes a great (quickly shot) short film.

Greg Bayne

Boise filmmaker Greg Bayne produced and directed two documentary features, Jens Pulver | DRIVEN (2011), and Bloodsworth–An Innocent Man (2015) and was recognized as the  2012 Sundance New Frontier Storytelling Fellow and 2015 IFP Screen Forward Lab fellow.vHis 2017 noir film, 6 Dynamic Laws for Success (In Life, Love & Money) was shown last weekend at The Flicks in Boise and has been extended for an additional week.

AP PHOTO/OTTO KITSINGER | gregorybayne.com | Montana Public Radio

Idaho primary elections arrive . . . Dr. Les Purce discusses his public service in Pocatello . . . Idaho filmmaker Greg Bayne talks noir . . . 

Travis Estvold

Over the weekend, Idaho filmmaking teams were given 48 hours to put together a short film for the 14th annual i48 film competition and festival.

The statewide film competition and festival is an annual event that brings together teams of filmmakers of all levels. Founder of i-48, Andrew Ellis, channeled his passion for film into creating this timed event in 2004.

 

Columbia Pictures

Prior to showing 'A River Runs Through It' in 1992, The Flicks in downtown Boise wasn't making much of a profit.

Thanks to a chance meeting at the Morrison Center between The Flicks owner Carole Skinner and Robert Redford, the film's director, the theater was able to obtain permission from Columbia Pictures to show the film. The weekend premiere of the movie attracted a record-breaking audience and jump-started a loyal following The Flicks would carry on for years to come.

The French drama Blue is the Warmest Color opens in U.S. theaters October 25, but you won’t be able to watch it in Idaho, at least not on the big screen.  

Films like this one would usually find a home at The Flicks Theatre, but not this time. 

Carole Skinner, who owns the Flicks, told The Hollywood Reporter, “It isn’t because we’re prudes.”

Boise Theater Reacts To Colorado Shooting

Jul 20, 2012
Sarah_Ackerman / Flickr

In the wake of the movie theater shooting in Colorado, theater owners have to consider something many have given little thought to in the past, security. One big company, AMC Theaters said Friday it will ban costumes and masks from its 300 plus movie houses. Regal Entertainment, which owns Boise's largest theater, says moviegoers should expect stricter controls over character attire and accessories. And the National Association of Theater Owners says it’s reviewing all security procedures.