Health

Stethescope, Health Care, Doctor, Medical
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Five companies will offer health insurance via Idaho's online marketplace for individuals and small businesses to get coverage.

The Idaho Statesman reports the companies offering insurance over the insurance exchange are Altius, Blue Cross of Idaho, BridgeSpan, PacificSource and SelectHealth.

BridgeSpan was created by Regence Blue Shield.

No prices have been announced for the 134 plans, but the average is $240 monthly, according to an earlier announcement.

Breast feeding, baby
JCarter / Flickr Creative Commons

Health officials say breast-feeding rates continue to inch up: Now more than 3 in 4 mothers try to breast-feed their newborns.

Breast-feeding rates remain highest in Idaho (91.8 percent) and lowest in Mississippi (50.5 percent). Experts attribute that to regional differences in culture and workplace policies that support breast-feeding.

Drugs, substance abuse
Ed Wohlfahrt / Flickr Creative Commons

The federal government is chipping in another $1.5 million annually over the next five years to help Idaho's efforts to fight substance abuse.

The state Office of Drug Policy announced the total $7.5 million grant on Monday.

Elisha Figueroa, administrator of the Office of Drug Policy, says the cash will help bolster community-level substance abuse prevention strategies and improve Idaho's prevention infrastructure.

Nearly $500 million.

That’s how much the federal government has awarded Washington, Oregon and Idaho to create health benefit exchanges. These are the new web portals to purchase insurance under the Affordable Care Act. It’s a costly undertaking that involves six-figure salaries, hefty IT contracts and high-end advertising campaigns.

If a green, talking gecko can sell car insurance, then maybe Portland-based folk singer Laura Gibson can sell health insurance.

Health coverage policies sold via Idaho's insurance exchange will cost an average of $240 per month, a figure based on the price tag of proposed policies submitted to the state Department of Insurance by insurers aiming to participate.

The figure, announced Thursday in Boise by the exchange board, is merely an average.

It doesn't reflect rates policy holders will actually pay, depending on their financial circumstances, eligibility for federal subsidies or their benefits package.

  Oregon parents could soon find it harder to skip having their children immunized.

The Oregon House Wednesday sent a measure to the governor that would add steps to the way parents can opt out of the requirement. A similar law went into effect in Washington state two years ago.

More than 6 percent of Oregon children enter kindergarten without the required number of vaccines. That rate is among the highest in the nation, and it has public health officials concerned.

Oregon lawmakers signed off Monday on a measure that makes it illegal to smoke in a car when there are children present. Drivers could only be ticketed for the offense if they've already been pulled over for something else.

Supporters include Republican representative Jim Thompson. He told colleagues that the bill seeks to protect children from an obvious harm.

Frozen Fruit Sold In Idaho Linked To Hepatitis Outbreak

Jun 3, 2013

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare says berries sold at Costco stores may be linked to an outbreak of hepatitis.

The frozen berry brand, 'Townsend Farms organic Anti-Oxidant Blend', has been pulled from Costco's shelves, and the store says to toss out any remaining product.

Although Idaho Costco stores carry these frozen berries, the health department says illness associated with the fruit hasn't been reported in Idaho.

Here's more information from the Department of Health and Welfare:

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

This week we've been bringing you the story of Idaho Army veteran Dan Sperry and his service dog Awescar.  This large labradoodle has had a major role in helping Dan cope with post traumatic stress disorder.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

This week we are bringing you the story of Dan Sperry. He's a U.S. Army veteran from Idaho and for the last two decades he's lived with post traumatic stress disorder or P.T.S.D.  We met Dan in 2010 and began to record his story of how he's found a new life by using a service dog

Mitchell Ponting
Molly Messick / StateImpact Idaho

When the 2013 legislative session wraps up, a big policy question will remain: Will the state make Medicaid available to a greater number of Idaho’s poor? The federal health care law encourages that move. It’s a debate that involves potential costs and savings, along with patient well-being. And it turns quickly to chronic conditions, like mental illness.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Last year, we told you about a group of stakeholders working together to create a state plan to help Alzheimer’s patients and their families.  The Idaho Alzheimer's Planning Group has now released that plan. 

Wheat
Molly Messick / Boise State Public Radio/StateImpact Idaho

This week an NPR  series has focused on worker deaths in grain storage bins around the country.  Now the Justice Department and others are beginning to respond. NPR reports Friday the Department will again consider criminal charges in a case of a boy who died in a grain bin three years ago in Illinois.

Idaho has had its share of tragedies in grain bins.

Idaho House Could Be In For Lengthy Debate On Health Exchange

Mar 13, 2013

The Idaho House of Representatives could be in for a marathon debate over the latest state-based health insurance exchange plan. The  discussion will start Wednesday  morning, less than a month after the Senate spent nearly six hours debating a similar proposal.

Idaho Senate President Pro-Tem Brent Hill joked Tuesday the debate in the House over an online insurance marketplace could be twice as long since that chamber has double the Legislators.

St. Luke's Hospital
St. Luke's

The Treasure Valley’s largest healthcare provider reacted Tuesday to a decision from the Idaho Attorney General’s office and the Federal Trade Commission to sue over a deal the agencies think would stifle competition. 

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