History

America in 1859 was a country on the verge of Civil War. Abolitionists and pro-slavery forces battled it out in the nation’s newspapers, activists were advocating revolts while southerners were talking secession, political parties were splitting down the middle, and a little-known senator named Abraham Lincoln was just coming into prominence. Against this backdrop, Charles Darwin’s pioneering work of evolutionary theory, The Origin of Species, landed like a bomb.

Millennials. Baby Boomers. Gen-Xers. The Greatest Generation. Each designation conjures up ideas and preconceptions about the Americans born during those eras. But what of the Gifted Generation? That designation may be less familiar. It refers to Americans born in the years following World War II. They are the earliest -- and historian David Goldfield would say, the most fortunate -- group of Baby Boomers.


Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Last summer, St. Luke’s Health System relocated a 100-foot-tall Sequoia tree from their campus in downtown Boise. This summer, they’re moving several historic houses.

  • Who knew you could still get a house call in Idaho?
  • Police and use of force.
  • Preserving Idaho's historical structures.

College of Idaho

A new book from an Idaho professor is out detailing the life and death of Jesus. The author is now up for an international award.

This encore interview with Nancy Koehn was originally broadcast in March, 2018.

  

Today’s mountaineers tackle the world’s tallest peaks with the latest in technical gear – from down suits to nylon ropes and even cell phones. It is a far cry from the 1920s, when the first mountaineers to attempt Mount Everest climbed in hobnail boots, hauled canvas tents and were literally facing the unknown.


Looking at the past through rose-colored glasses is nothing new – we’ve been doing it in various forms for centuries.  But when it comes to family life, that yearning for a simpler, happier time can be particularly potent. Mid-century television shows such as “Leave it To Beaver” and “Ozzie and Harriett,” celebrated the nuclear family, where Dad was the breadwinner, Mom managed the house and kids, and everything seemed to run smoothly.  But was life really so great back then, or was this simply an illusion?


This interview was originally broadcast in January, 2018.

For most of its history, America has struggled to maintain a balance between fantasy and fact. According to today’s guest, Kurt Andersen, our country is now in a moment where we feel entitled to believe whatever we want, regardless of the evidence. How this happened, and why we should be concerned, is the subject of his book, Fantasyland, How America Went Haywire, A 500-Year History.  


Dana Oland / Idaho Statesman

The fire was reported at the Gene Harris Bandshell in Julia Davis Park around 8:15 p.m. Monday. The red, Spanish revival roof was damaged in the fire, but the extent of the damage isn’t clear yet. Tuesday, fire investigators determined the cause was man-made but aren’t sure whether the fire was set on purpose. Boise police are now handling the investigation.


This is an encore of the program which was originally broadcast in August of 2017.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is revered as an 18th century genius who composed some of the most sublime music ever written.  The fact that a starling became his beloved pet during one of the most creative and productive periods of his short life has perplexed historians and music lovers for years. Yet the unlikely story of the great composer and his common bird is a true one, and today’s guest, Lyanda Lynn Haupt, explores it in detail in her new book, titled “Mozart’s Starling.”

In 1961, the world watched as tensions flared and the Berlin Wall went up, trapping East Germans inside a Communist regime. What was less well known was what was happening under that wall. Away from the glare of television cameras and public demonstrations, defectors and West Germans engaged in clandestine efforts to build tunnels and help East Germans escape.

The war that became known as World War I began over 100 years ago and ushered in a new type of warfare – one built underground, in trenches, instead of above ground, on horses. In his book, To End All Wars, Adam Hochschild brings the war to life in a stark and dramatic new way.

Idaho State Historical Society

In our series of Legacy of Hate, we explore the Confederate connection to Idaho history and politics. 

Fifty years after he was assassinated at age 39, Malcolm X remains a controversial and somewhat mysterious figure. During his short but eventful life, he was a minister with the Nation of Islam who went on to found his own mosque, a fiery militant who advocated “any means necessary” to attain racial justice, and a brilliant, charismatic speaker whose legacy is still being determined.

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