Our Changing Idaho

Molly Messick / Boise State Public Radio

When we started looking into our series “Our Changing Idaho,” we asked listeners to call or write in with comments about growth. We heard one consistent theme over and over: Families kept saying that they want to buy a home, but can’t afford it in the current housing market.

LACEY DALEY / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Boise State Public Radio concludes its series on growth, Our Changing Idaho.  Today, BSPR's James Dawson looks at examples of responsible, sustainable growth that can be applied in the growing regions of Idaho.

  • Our team of Idaho reporters break down the week's headlines.
  • The final installment of Our Changing Idaho looks at lessons in growth.
  • BSPR's Tom Michael speaks with a legendary Broadway producer.

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Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Just over 100 people moved to Idaho on average each day last year – with about 19 per day landing in Boise. What can this community learn from bigger cities that have already grappled with a population boom and an affordable housing crisis?

Credit Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

We hear the fourth installment of 'Our Changing Idaho' and talk to BSPR reporter Matt Guilham about a small Idaho town that is neither growing like many Idaho cities, nor shrinking like many American small towns.

Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

This spring, we asked you to share stories about how Idaho’s rapid growth is changing your life. Since then we’ve heard from dozens of you over social media, email, voicemail and through our website. We received memories about dairy farms on Federal Way in Boise, concerns about sprawl in Ada County, excitement about newcomers with new ideas and anxiety about a loss of beloved places.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows the influx of people flocking to the Gem State boosting populations – and changing the fortunes – of a majority of Idaho’s cities. However, smaller communities aren’t seeing the same spikes.

  • Treasure Valley rental rates are on the rise.
  • BSPR's 'Our Changing Idaho' looks at a small Idaho town.
  • Efforts to enact conservancy in Yellowstone.
  • A local group aids homeless women with hygiene products.

Amanda Peacher / Mountain West New Bureau

Every day, about 19 people move to Boise. And that growth is creating a housing crunch in the valley.

 

  • Kids and social media.
  • McCall's alcohol ban, one year later.
  • Key federal conservation fund scheduled to expire.
  • A look at the third installment of 'Our Changing Idaho.'

FRANKIE BARNHILL / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Boise State Public Radio continues its series looking at the growth in Idaho and the various social, economic and environmental impacts on the people and institutions of the state. The second installment of Our Changing Idaho airs on Tuesday's Idaho Matters.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

It’s 7:00 p.m. after a long day of work, and Rudy and Sami Ashenbrener sit on their back porch in Twin Falls. Their eight-month-old Miles is in his high chair next to them while their dog Hercules runs around their backyard.

  • A look at Idaho's new trespass law and other new laws.
  • Idaho SAT scores in decline.
  • A first-of-its-kind transplant at St. Luke's.
  • The second installment of BSPR's 'Our Changing Idaho'

SAMANTHA WRIGHT / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

Boise State Public Radio is rolling out a series looking at the growth in Idaho and the various social, economic and environmental impacts on the people and institutions of the state. The first installment of Our Changing Idaho airs on Monday's Idaho Matters.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Sixth-grade teacher Mandy Stansell has lived in Boise her whole life, but three months ago she moved to her new home, looking out over the farm fields of Kuna.

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