Real Estate

Credit Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Treasure Valley housing prices are steadily increasing, as are rental rates. We speak with Boise Regional Realtors CEO Breanna Vanstrom and Equity Idaho Northwest Real Estate's Gary Salisbury about the state of housing in Southwest Idaho.

For Sale Coldwell Banker House Sold
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The blazing hot real estate market in Ada County has just set two new records and it's all about the numbers.

Derek K. Miller / Flickr

Despite Idaho’s rural character, the state isn’t exempt from issues of housing affordability associated with more developed regions. A new report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition finds a disparity between Idaho wages and the cost of rent.

Molly Messick / StateImpact Idaho

After months of skyrocketing home prices in Ada County, April saw a slight dip.

By most indices, the Treasure Valley is the fastest growing region in the country, rapidly driving up property values.  But unlike similar booms in Atlanta, Phoenix and Las Vegas, new housing starts are not matching the explosion in population.

NeighborWorks Boise

A planned block of new homes in the Treasure Valley is attracting buyers before the foundations are even laid.

Chapendra / Flickr

Housing prices across the Treasure Valley keep rising as the supply of homes remains stagnant.

The median price of home in Canyon County is up over 10 percent from the same time last year. Homes in the county are now up to $164,700. Last July, the average price was $160,000.

Screenshot / Zillow.com

A report making the rounds of the internet and getting cited in papers around Idaho posits the town of Victor in the far east of the state had the most expensive ZIP code in Idaho. That claim is being debunked.

The report came from website GoBankingRates.com which calculated the median home prices in Victor at just shy of $350,000. With that figure, the website awarded Victor the title of priciest ZIP in the state.

For Sale Coldwell Banker House Sold
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Home ownership in Idaho’s two most populous counties is getting less affordable. That’s according to a report released Thursday by real estate data company RealtyTrac.

How affordable your home is has to do with the percentage of your income you have to spend on it. RealtyTrac says home prices are going up faster than income in Ada and Canyon Counties. So homes are getting less affordable.

Bradley Gordon / Flickr Creative Commons

You’ve probably heard of the wage gap. Women tend to get paid less than men for the same work. Now, a new report from the real estate information company RealtyTrac says that gap means women have less of a chance of developing wealth through home ownership.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

There were a lot more places to live in Idaho last year than there were the year before, according to a report from the U.S. Census Bureau. There were 685,099 housing units in Idaho in 2014. To the census, a housing unit is most anywhere people live; houses, mobile homes, apartments large or small. 

The number of Idaho units went up by more than 6,000 between July 2013 and July 2014. That was the biggest increase the state had seen in several years.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Real estate data company RealtyTrac says Boise is in better shape than most of the country when it comes to the difference between wages and home prices.

RealtyTrac looked at wage growth and home price growth from 2012 to 2014 in the nation’s 184-largest metro areas. Nationally, price growth outpaced wage growth 13-to-one. RealtyTrac vice president Daren Blomquist says in Boise, it was closer to four-to-one.

Data: See The Change In Ada County Property Values

Jun 3, 2014
chart, home values
Data: Ada County Assessor | Chart: Adam Cotterell

Property values in Idaho's most-populated county went up between 2013 and 2014 in a big way. This is the second year in a row Ada County's property values increased. Of course those increases are on the heels of four-straight years of decline after the housing bubble burst.  

Paul VanDerWerf / Flickr Creative Commons

If you own a home in Ada County, you may have received a letter in the mail last week from the county assessor’s office. And that letter probably said your property value had gone up, maybe even substantially.

That's good news for those wanting to sell their house or those who’ve been underwater on their mortgage. But the increases could mean higher taxes, and it could actually be bad news for the economy. 

Jessica Murri / For Boise State Public Radio

A new Idaho law set to take effect this summer will curb the power of homeowners' associations after state lawmakers felt some organizations were abusing their authority.

HOAs are popular in Idaho's larger cities. Six years ago, the Idaho Senate estimated there were around 2,500 homeowners' associations in the state. An HOA's goal is to keep neighborhood property values up by enforcing covenants and bylaws. Residents who don’t always abide can be fined. 

Pages