Sports & Recreation

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

State officials approved a lease for Tamarack Resort's ski area in about as long as it takes an expert skier to go from the top of the mountain to the bottom.

The five members of the Idaho Land Board voted unanimously at a special session Thursday to transfer the 2,100-acre lease to a company called New TRAC.

New TRAC acquired the lease following a sheriff's bankruptcy sale in March.

The lease costs about $278,000 annually, far more than the $80,000 the land would generate if it reverted to timber harvest.

College of Idaho

There's been a buzz around the College of Idaho campus this week that hasn't existed there since the 1970s. 

Last weekend the school played - and won - its first football game since 1977. The Yotes beat Pacific University 35-34. College of Idaho plays its first home game Saturday afternoon against Montana Western at Simplot Stadium in Caldwell. 

Boise State Photo Services

Boise State opens its home football schedule Saturday night at Albertsons Stadium. The game vs. Colorado State marks the first time fans entering the stadium will be required to walk through metal detectors.

The university has purchased nearly $200,000 worth of equipment to help beef up security.

Greg Hahn, a university spokesman, says Idaho’s recent change in campus gun laws led Boise State to make the move.

BigEdBeckley.net

The Twin Falls Times-News reports that Texas stuntman "Big Ed" Beckley says he won’t jump the Snake River Canyon. At least not this year.  

On his webpage, Beckley writes that since the Fox television network “backed out” of a TV deal, he’s looking for a media partner for 2015. 

Slide the City

How does sliding down a busy Boise street on a 1,000 foot waterslide sound?

Amazing.

Utah-based Slide the City is making plans to bring its giant waterslide to Boise. The event is tentatively scheduled for Sept. 6, and details are contingent on permitting. If approved, you may have the chance to slip-and-slide your way down Americana Boulevard between Ann Morrison Park and Kathryn Albertson Park.

The U.S. Forest Service has banned exploding targets in southern Idaho, southwestern Wyoming, Nevada, Utah and a small portion of eastern California because of wildfire and public safety concerns.

Intermountain Region Forester Nora Rasure issued the ban that started Wednesday and runs through July 22, 2015, on national forest lands.

Some target shooters use exploding targets because they contain chemicals that mix when struck by a bullet and create a loud bang and big puff of smoke.

Fox Won't Broadcast Stuntman's Snake River Canyon Jump

Jul 23, 2014
Big Ed Beckley's Facebook page

The Times-News reports that the Fox television network won't broadcast Texas stuntman "Big" Ed Beckley's planned Snake River Canyon motorcycle jump.

On his Facebook page, Beckley writes the network didn't have the money to broadcast the event.

"We received the final word the executes at FOX TV have backed away from the Snake River Canyon Jump. It was not in their new budget for us to make the jump.

@AdamEschbach / Twitter

More than 1,000 people gathered in a downtown Boise plaza to watch the US take on Belgium in the World Cup.

Fans across the country Tuesday gathered in public spaces, bars and sports stadiums to watch the U.S. try to move deeper into the tournament.

Boise's crowd showed their patriotic spirit, either with painted faces, flag-themed clothing or wrapped in oversized American flags at the Grove Plaza, braving 90-degree temperatures as they watched the U.S.'s fourth game in Brazil.

Albertsons, stadium
Boise State University

Boise State University has announced a $12.5 million, 15-year deal to change the name of the school's blue-turf football stadium from Bronco Stadium to Albertsons Stadium.

School President Bob Kustra made the announcement Wednesday morning at the stadium along with Albertsons CEO Bob Miller.

Miller says he can't wait for the first football game of the season when the stadium will be adorned with the new name.

The stadium is notable for its blue turf where the Boise State Broncos play.

Yellowstone, Mammoth, hot springs
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Visitors will be able to travel through the east, west and north entrances to Yellowstone National Park starting Friday.

Park officials say many popular park destinations including Old Faithful, the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Norris Geyser Basin and Fishing Bridge will be open although visitor services will be limited at first.

Avalanches could still cause periodic closures of the east entrance road for the next several weeks because of deep snowpack above Sylvan Pass. Vehicles will not be able to stop on the pass because of the slide potential.

A family-owned sporting goods company in suburban Seattle is confronting the tension between honoring tradition and embracing innovation in the sport of baseball.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s Department of Fish and Game is on a mission to create the next generation of anglers. One of the ways they’re doing that is by hosting free events where they teach kids the basics of fishing.

On a recent windy spring day at McDevitt Park in West Boise, a trailer with the Idaho Fish and Game logo is parked by a small manmade pond. Department employee Chelsea Lundy helps a mom and her daughter put a big fat nightcrawler on a hook, along with a marshmallow.

mount everest
ExpeditionMedicine / Flickr

A Boise resident climbing Mount Everest with a film crew as part of a motivational project for injured veterans didn't get caught in an avalanche Friday that killed at least 12 Napalese guides.

The Heroes Project spokesman Zach Rosenfield says 28-year-old Staff Sgt. Charlie Linville remains at basecamp at 17,598 feet where he arrived on Wednesday.

Linville lost his right foot, several fingers and suffered an injured back while diffusing a bomb in Afghanistan in 2011.

Thanks to late-season snow that fell at many area Cascade ski areas will welcome skiers and snowboarders well past Easter.

Jeff Myers / Flickr

Boise National Forest officials are warning drivers to stay off snow-covered forest roads.

Boise National Forest spokesman David Olson says drivers are finding lower elevations are clear, until they start climbing higher into the forest.

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