Transportation

Lime

Last Thursday, Meridian brought electric scooters to their streets from scooter-rental company Lime. But less than a week after 200 scooters were deployed, the city and other parts of Ada County were facing concerns.

Lime

Update Wednesday, Oct. 10: The pay-as-you-go scooters from a company called Lime that took over Meridian for a few days won’t be back anytime soon. After debuting on September 27th, all of the scooters were pulled from the streets after a request by Meridian city officials on October 2nd. Now, a representative with Lime says a rollout of the conveyances is suspended until March of 2019.

The Idaho Press reports that in the interim, the company will launch an education campaign to show residents how to use the scooters. Lime is staying tight lipped on just how many scooters will go on the road in March.

While Meridian pauses its relationship with Lime, the City of Boise is in talks with the scooter purveyor and a rival. The Statesman reports the city is taking its time as it irons out rules for bike and scooter share companies. Boise Administrative Services Manager Craig Croner says scooters could be on the streets in the capital by the end of the month.

Update Wednesday, Oct. 3: At a Meridian city council meeting Tuesday, the city requested Lime to put the scooters on hold until more discussion can take place about the future of the scooters. Over the weekend, before a hold was put on Lime’s services in Meridian, Lime reduced the number of scooters from 200 to 100. 

 

Original post Friday Sept. 28: The California company Lime has brought their electric scooters to Meridian. Called Lime-S scooters, the devices cost $1 to unlock and 15 cents per minute of riding. But unlike some programs around the country that rely on centralized stations where the scooters are locked to metal racks, these scooters will be dockless.

Mike Ensor / Flickr

The infrastructure project to widen part of Interstate 84 through Canyon County received a major federal grant from the Department of Transportation.

Mountain Rides Transportation Authority

Mountain Rides Transportation Authority provides bus service in Sun Valley, Ketchum, Hailey, Bellevue and Carey – and vanpool service to more rural communities like Fairfield, Jerome and Gooding.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Valley Regional Transit just wrapped up three open houses to get public input on 10 different proposals to change bus routes in Boise. There’s still time to weigh in on the city’s mass transit system.

Hatters! / Flickr

The unofficial start of summer is practically here. Thousands will hit the road Memorial Day weekend. Ahead of the holiday, AAA Idaho is suggesting travelers start packing two days before leaving.

reason.org

The Reason Foundation is out with its annual Highway Report. It finds Idaho is one of the top states in the nation when it comes to cost effectiveness and highway performance.

raymondclarkeimages / Flickr

A Republican in the Idaho House introduced legislation that would do away with the state’s dual speed limits for cars and commercial trucks.

Ben Beard / Flickr Creative Commons

After two grocery stores closed in Nampa in 2016, it created a food desert for residents who used to walk to the markets. Fresh fruits, vegetables and unprocessed foods have since become virtually inaccessible for people without reliable transportation.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Capital City Development Corporation recently received a study it commissioned looking at options for pedestrians and cyclists along the busy downtown streets of Front and Myrtle.

Rob Stanley / Flickr Creative Commons

The project to expand I-84 in Canyon County is set to get a big financial boost. On Thursday, the Idaho Transportation Board approved over $100 million in additional funding for the freeway widening from a variety of sources.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise Depot is one of those places Boiseans take visitors to show off their town. The early 20th Century Spanish architecture stands out and is a great backdrop for weddings and parties.

But the one thing you haven’t found at the depot for 20 years? Passenger trains.

Colin Falconer has long wondered why that is. Falconer is originally from Seattle and used to take the Amtrak to northern Idaho to swim in lakes with friends when he was a kid. He loved being able to watch the scenery go by, and goof around in the aisles with his buddies.

MjZ Photography / Flickr

Idaho transportation officials have agreed to spend $150 million in newly approved bonds to repair and add lanes on Interstate 84 near Nampa.

The state transportation board unanimously voted Friday to reconstruct existing lanes, as well as add additional lanes and upgrade bridges.

Idaho Transportation Department Director Brian Ness says the currently congested corridor is a top concern and affects all of Idaho.

Charlie Litchfield / AP

The Idaho Legislature closed up shop and went home Wednesday. The session went five days longer than leadership had anticipated.

The session was notable for a few bills, including transportation funding and tax cuts, which were sticking points at the end of the session. Lawmakers also didn’t find a solution for the 78,000 Idahoans who fall in the Medicaid gap and don’t have health insurance.

AP

A massive transportation funding bill is making its way through the Idaho Statehouse as lawmakers hope to finish their work before the end of the day.

Senate members spent nearly two hours Tuesday debating a roughly $320 million proposal to funnel more money to roads and bridges. A similar proposal had failed in the Senate chamber just last week on a 15-20 vote. This forced transportation and infrastructure advocates scrambling to rewrite a new plan before adjournment, which in the end wooed enough lawmakers to vote 19-16.

Pages