Treefort Music Fest

Chris Goldberg / Flickr Creative Commons

In the note posted on social media Monday, Trevor Powers told fans “youth lagoon is complete.” The Boise musician, who attained wide national acclaim for his debut album entitled "The Year Of Hibernation" and subsequent two albums, says his upcoming tour is his last one as Youth Lagoon. The band starts their European tour later this week.

Photo provided by Reed Lindsay

Baseball is known as America’s pastime. But a short documentary by Idaho-born filmmaker Reed Lindsay might make you question if another country is more deserving of this title. 

 

Jeremy Conant / Treefort Music Fest

Treefort Music Fest announced another 100-or-so musical acts to play the March 23-27 festival. Boise rockers Built to Spill will perform once again, along with a slew of other bands.

Listen here for a Soundcloud playlist featuring some of the bands to play #treefort2016.

Treefort Musi Fest

They said it was coming.

The team behind Treefort Music Fest has been hyping the first announcement of musicians to play the March festival, and this morning they let the cat out of the bag. It's the fifth year the multi-day event will take over music and arts venues around downtown Boise.

bcorporation.net

Boise's Treefort Music Fest is stepping out under a new business model. According to a press release Friday, the music festival received Benefit Corporation (B Corp) certification this summer, becoming the first and only music festival with that status. B Corporations are for-profits where shareholders adhere to missions that include transparency, positive social impact on local communities and environmental consciousness.

Treefort Music Fest

If you want to be one of the 200 people to snag a $50 ticket to Treefort Music Fest, you better be poised to hit the “purchase” button on your laptop at 10:00 a.m. sharp tomorrow morning.

Early Bird passes, as they’re called, typically sell out within minutes of their release. Once those are gone, the price of entry will increase to $139. And right before the festival kicks off in March, those passes will jump to $179.  That's the most expensive general admission tickets have been in Treefort's five-year history.

Adam Wright / Treefort Music Fest

It's official: 2015 was a record-breaking year for Treefort Music Fest. In their fourth year, organizers of the five-day long indie event met their goal of breaking even. Sales Director Drew Lorona – who helped found Treefort four years ago – says that financial success ensures the festival will continue in 2016.

"It's the first time that we've had the festival generate enough income on its own as a functioning business to kickstart the next year's festival," Lorona says. 

Built to Spill / YouTube

If you attended Built to Spill's performance during Treefort Music Fest this year, you probably noticed a weird pirate-looking guy on stage.

He came into view for several minutes during the Boise set (the first show of the band's new tour) and hopped around making bizarre gestures at lead singer Doug Martsch. The two intermittently interacted, seeming to talk with one another during the show while Martsch played. It didn't make much sense at the time.

Alex Hecht / Treefort Music Fest

Treefort Music Fest organizers had hoped to garner a wider audience of music fans this year, so they brought in a mix of well-known and under-the-radar bands for the indie festival. Over the course of five days, more than 400 bands performed at venues across downtown Boise.
 

Alex Crick / For KEXP

San Francisco band Geographer stopped in Boise this week to perform at the fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest, the same week the group released their third album "Ghost Modern." The album is their first since 2012.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The 2015 Treefort Music Fest ramps up Friday with the opening of its main stage in downtown Boise.  By the time the event ends Sunday, more than 400 bands will have entertained thousands of indie music fans.  One of those fans is journalist David Greenwald.  He writes about music for the Oregonian newspaper.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

El Korah Shrine is one of those buildings in downtown Boise people pass by all the time, but probably haven’t ever been in. In the last couple of years, Treefort Music Fest has exposed thousands of people to the venue – giving the old-school fraternal organization some new-found relevance with a younger crowd.  

Treefort Music Fest
Matthew Wordell

The fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest kicks off in Boise Wednesday. The 5-day event will take over much of downtown Boise, as 430 musical acts are set to perform (check out the 13 must-see bands).

I spoke with Emilie Ritter Saunders Wednesday during Morning Edition about Treefort. Here's our conversation.

Tyler Garcia / Treefort Music Fest

When Boise's fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest gets underway Wednesday, around 200 writers, bloggers and reporters will be covering the event. 

Kymm Cornelison is the festival’s publicity director.  She says music news outlets from places like Portland, Seattle, Denver, San Francisco and Los Angeles are among those represented.   

More media will cover Treefort in 2015 than ever before. The number of credentials has doubled since the festival's first year. As coverage has grown, so has the festival. 

Treefort
Jeremy Conant / Treefort Music Fest

Yeah we know, 13 may seem like a pretty random number, but might as well choose a traditionally lucky number out of the dizzying 430 bands scheduled to play the fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest in Boise Wednesday through Sunday.

Clearly, the indie music fest has really owned the "go big or go home" ideal this year.

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