Wanna Know Idaho

Whether you're a lifelong Idahoan or a transplant just now settling in, chances are you've probably had a moment or two like this:

You're driving down Capitol Boulevard in Boise or camping along the Salmon River and you've seen something that makes you wonder, What's up with that?

Maybe it's as simple as, "Why are there so many Abraham Lincoln statues in downtown Boise?"

Or maybe it's more complicated, like, "What are the pros and cons of bringing the F-35 to Boise?" 

Wanna Know Idaho is a people-powered podcast from Boise State Public Radio's newsroom that is driven by YOUR curiosity. We can't make this podcast without you.

Here's how it works: You submit your questions to Wanna Know Idaho. After we collect questions, we'll let the public vote on the one they want us to answer most. Then, a reporter will investigate the winning question and we'll share what we learn on the podcast.

No matter how quirky or serious your question might be, we want to know: What sparks your curiosity about the Gem State, Idaho culture or the people who call it home?

Let's get started! Share your questions below, and subscribe to the podcast here...

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via Google Maps

 

For this round of Wanna Know Idaho – we’re headed to the West Central Mountains. Have you ever wondered…

How Cascade Reservoir became Lake Cascade?

Or why the average age of people in the region seems to be higher than in other parts of the state? 

Or maybe you’re wondering about the potential impacts of an open pit mine that's been proposed by the Midas Gold Corp.? 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Depending on where you live in Idaho, you might find that prices at your local gas station are 30-40 cents higher per gallon than in neighboring Wyoming and Montana. So...what’s up with that? 

Update -- This voting round has closed. The winning question: "What about the prices we pay at the pump: Why does it seem like the price of gas is higher in the Gem State than in surrounding states?" Be sure to subscribe to the podcast here!

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

August in Idaho means the last month of summer vacation, county fairs, camping and … oh yeah, wildfires. Here's just a few of the wildfire stories Boise State Public Radio covered this month.

OK, so you know that typically, the decisions about what stories you hear on your podcast feed or on the radio are made by...someone else. Typically: reporters, editors and hosts.

But what if instead – YOU got to decide what stories get told? And what if you got to help report the story you’re curious about – and learn a little about how journalism is made while you’re at it?

Welcome to Wanna Know Idaho, a podcast from Boise State Public Radio.  

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

Update: We're no longer accepting question submissions on this topic. But we need your vote! It's up to YOU to decide which story we report on next. Vote here by midnight Saturday, Aug. 18.

Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

This spring, we asked you to share stories about how Idaho’s rapid growth is changing your life. Since then we’ve heard from dozens of you over social media, email, voicemail and through our website. We received memories about dairy farms on Federal Way in Boise, concerns about sprawl in Ada County, excitement about newcomers with new ideas and anxiety about a loss of beloved places.

In 2017, Boise's Greenbelt sustained massive damage as a result of a wet winter and subsequent flooding. So as spring settles in this time around, it's no wonder folks are recalling the events of last year.

Oregon Historical Society

Idaho: a lot of us live here, but how many of us know the origin of the word itself?

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Treefort Music Fest is taking over downtown Boise. More than 400 bands are scheduled to play over the five day festival. For this installment of Wanna Know Idaho, we take a look at how the selection process works.

Karen A. Demsey

The Snake River Canyon is an iconic landscape -- especially for people who live in central Idaho. And one of our listeners from Twin Falls was curious to know more about how it was formed.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Monday, February 12 would have been President Abraham Lincoln’s 209th birthday, which is a big deal for people like Dave Leroy. Leroy is Idaho’s unofficial Lincoln scholar, and has amassed quite a collection of artifacts connected to our 16th President over several decades.

James Dawson

Once you’re old enough to read, it’s hard not to notice the sign: “Welcome to Historic Lewiston, Idaho – Idaho’s First Territorial Capital.”

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The holiday season is replete with parties, get togethers and acts of generosity, but navigating it all can be difficult. For this seasonal installment of Wanna Know Idaho, we asked listeners about holiday etiquette.  

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Artist Pat Kilby is an oil painter.

“And I like to work in bright colors and kind of quirky perspective, little bit cartoonish I guess some people say,” says Kilby.

And he often would drive home on Fifth Street in downtown Boise and see the plain, white traffic box that controls the streetlight.

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