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What is the single most important question about COVID-19 you think needs to be answered? Submit it for a special Idaho Matters Doctors Roundtable in English and Spanish.

Anthony Flint got Guillain-Barré syndrome after COVID-19 shot and still says 'get vaccinated'

COVID-19 vaccines have been a remarkable success. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 221 million people in the U.S — two-thirds of the population — are fully vaccinated, and serious adverse reactions are extremely rare.

In fact, as of last week, just 238 of the more than 15 million people in the United States who got the Johnson & Johnson shot came down with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a disorder in which the immune system attacks nerve cells. Health experts conclude that the risks of not getting vaccinated are much higher.

Anthony Flint agrees — he’s one of the 238 people — and still a staunch advocate for the vaccines. He’s a former Boston Globe reporter, now with the non-profit Lincoln Institute which concentrates on sustainable land use. Host Robin Young talks to Flint about his experience and why he supports the vaccine.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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