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Next generation of COVID-19 vaccines may not be shots

A researcher manipulates proteins in a laboratory of the Tours University. The University of Tours and the French National Research Institute For Agriculture, Food And Environment (INRAE) announced on Sept. 9, 2021, the design of a nasal spray vaccine candidate against COVID-19. (Guillaume SouvantT/AFP via Getty Images)
A researcher manipulates proteins in a laboratory of the Tours University. The University of Tours and the French National Research Institute For Agriculture, Food And Environment (INRAE) announced on Sept. 9, 2021, the design of a nasal spray vaccine candidate against COVID-19. (Guillaume SouvantT/AFP via Getty Images)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports nearly 74% of Americans 5 years and older have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. But much of the rest of the world remains unvaccinated.

That may change, with dozens of new vaccines under development. Many of those new vaccines may come in pill or nasal spray form. Brett Dahlberg of IEEE Spectrum takes a look at some of these second-generation vaccines.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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