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How we can transform child protective services

A swing stands at a playground at the "Abenteuerland" child daycare center during a visit by German Family Minister Franziska Giffey (not pictured) in Berlin, Germany.
A swing stands at a playground at the "Abenteuerland" child daycare center during a visit by German Family Minister Franziska Giffey (not pictured) in Berlin, Germany.

Each year, Child Protective Services, or CPS, investigates the families of more than 3 million children in the U.S.These state agencies are tasked with protecting kids from abuse and neglect. 

It’s a job with incredibly high stakes for families and few happy endings.Families of color are more likely to be investigated. A study determined that one in four Black children were victims, compared to one in eight white children.

How do overworked caseworkers handle the colossal task they take on? How can CPS protect both children andfamilies?

Jessica Pryce joins us from Orlando, Florida to talk about it.Her new book is called Broken: Transforming Child Protective Services ― Notes of a Former Caseworker.” She’s a research professor at Florida State University College of Social Work and the former executive director of the Florida Institute for Child Welfare.

Copyright 2024 WAMU 88.5

Avery Jessa Chapnick

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