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C.L. “Butch” Otter has been a fixture of Idaho politics since 1973 when he was elected to his first term in the state House of Representatives.Otter was elected to his third-consecutive term as governor on Nov. 4, 2014. He was elected to his second term as Idaho governor on Nov. 2, 2010. Otter first became Idaho's governor on Nov. 7, 2006.Gov. Otter was at the helm during the peak of the Great Recession and it was his administration that oversaw the cutting of the state budget, record unemployment, and a boom in the number of people using government assistance.Otter spoke with StateImpact Idaho back in 2012 about that recession and its lasting impact on Idaho's workforce.Governor Otter: Every Generation Deals with Joblessness and We Live Through ItA Brief BiographyOtter, a Republican, is the longest serving lieutenant governor of Idaho, his tenure spanned from 1987-2000. In 2000 he was then elected to the United States Congress and served until 2006.According to the Washington Post, Otter voted with his party most of the time, 86 percent, but has been known to have an independent streak on some issues.“He was among three Republicans in the House to vote against the USA Patriot Act in 2001 and he later sponsored a bill to repeal parts of it. But independent streaks are sometimes tolerated in a state that would rather not be told what to do by the federal government.” - William Yardley, New York TimesOtter was born on May 3, 1942 in Caldwell, Idaho. He attended St. Teresa’s Academy in Boise and graduated from Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1967.After college, Otter joined the Idaho National Guard and served in the 116th Armored Calvary until 1973.Butch Otter is married to his second wife, Lori. He has four children and several grandchildren.

Ketchum Says Idaho's Wolf Management Policies Hurting Tourism

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The resort town of Ketchum, Idaho, is asking the state to back off on killing wolves. They say it’s bad for business.

The Ketchum City Council passed a resolution Monday night urging wildlife managers to use non-lethal tactics to control the wolf population.

Tourists like wolves -- or at least they like the opportunity to catch a glimpse of them. That’s the message from the Ketchum City Council. Councilors take issue with a new state Wolf Depredation Control Board in Idaho. It’s been given a $500,000 budget to kill wolves that clash with ranchers and sportsmen -- because wolves eat cattle and sheep, as well as deer and elk.

But Ketchum Mayor Nina Jonas wants the governor to keep those efforts out of her county.

“The initial attraction and the real core of our community is the value and the quality and the quantity of our outdoor experience,” she said.

Jonas said there’s also an image issue. Some pro-wolf groups have organized boycotts of Idaho.

Ketchum is asking the state to collaborate on a project that helps ranchers use alternative measures against wolves like strobe lights, electric fences and guard dogs.

A spokesman for Gov. Butch Otter said decisions about how to manage wildlife are up to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.