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BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis, and here is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks, everybody. Because we are public radio people, everybody assumes we're unathletic nerds, and we aren't any good at sports. And they are, of course, right. But we are interested in talking to people who are good at them.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, what would a great player be without a great coach? Well, according to at least one of them, they'd still be great players.

BILL KURTIS: Coach Mike D'Antoni of the Houston Rockets joined us in January of this year. We asked him about working with a superstar on his team.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST)

SAGAL: What's it like getting to watch James Harden play every night?

MIKE D'ANTONI: Special.

SAGAL: Yeah.

D'ANTONI: He's the real deal.

SAGAL: Yeah.

It may be strange for tourists to land in Hong Kong to find throngs of impassioned protesters. They might wonder: What do they expect me to do about the Chinese government?

Tourists come from all over the world to see the elegantly industrious city-state.

"It is like a cauldron," Jan Morris wrote in her book Hong Kong, "seething, hissing, hooting, arguing, enmeshed in a labyrinth of tunnels and overpasses, with those skyscrapers erupting everywhere into view, with those ferries churning and hovercraft splashing and great jets flying in."

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Finally, time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

When is it wrong to show cigarette smoking on television, but OK to depict people smoking cannabis products, particularly in programming popular among young teenagers?

What One Attendee Remembers From Woodstock

Aug 17, 2019

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A young man clowns around with a bicycle or two. Cardi B strikes a pose. A man in a camouflage uniform blends into camouflage wallpaper but the flowers he holds are an explosion of color.

"How does one man have so much power?"

One hears that question asked in Washington a lot these days, often with exasperation and bewilderment.

And it is not always a reference to President Trump.

Quite often, the man in question is Mitch McConnell, the Republican senator from Kentucky.

The man who calls himself the "Grim Reaper" — of signature Democratic initiatives.

It turns out that in Maryland, reeking of marijuana is not sufficient probable cause for police to arrest and search a person.

In a unanimous ruling earlier this week, the state's Court of Appeals determined two police officers violated a man's Fourth Amendment rights by conducting an unreasonable warrantless search of his person, after police found him in a car that smelled like pot.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide in his Manhattan prison cell, according to the office of New York City's chief medical examiner. The office announced its findings in a statement released Friday afternoon, six days after the wealthy financier was found unresponsive while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The trailer for one of the most anticipated movies of the year dropped this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LITTLE WOMEN")

SAOIRSE RONAN: (As Jo) I'm working on a novel. It is a story of my life and my sisters.

When Dylan Nelson was admitted to the ICU in July with difficulty breathing, his mother, Kim Barnes. figured it was his asthma acting up. But when she got to the hospital in Burlington, Wis., he couldn't speak. He was intubated. His blood oxygen level was only 10%. He was put into a medically induced coma.

Barnes told the nurse she worried she wouldn't see her 26-year-old son again. The nurse reassured her.

Updated at 7:25 p.m. ET

The computer systems of Customs and Border Protection are returning at major airports around the country.

"The affected systems are coming back online and travelers are being processed," a CBP statement said. "There is no indication the disruption was malicious in nature at this time."

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The back and forth over the congresswomen's visit, now non-visit, to Israel is where we begin our weekly politics chat. Today I am joined by Politico's Eliana Johnson.

Welcome back.

ELIANA JOHNSON: Thank you.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2019 WUWM 89.7 FM - Milwaukee's NPR. To see more, visit WUWM 89.7 FM - Milwaukee's NPR.

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President Trump may have been joking about wanting to buy Greenland, if he said it, but officials there want him to know: The island isn't for sale.

Aaja Chemnitz Larsen, a Greenlandic politician, told Here & Now that she was "not surprised" by media reports that the U.S. president was interested in purchasing the massive, ice-covered island.

"It sounds a little bit like a joke because Greenland is not for sale," she said.

Money flowed into Colorado politics earlier this year when hardline gun rights supporters attempted to recall a state representative who supported Colorado’s extreme risk protection order law (ERPO), a controversial piece of gun legislation. But now, two months since that effort failed, the ability to trace where some of those funds came from and how they were spent is limited by Colorado’s campaign finance laws.

Updated at 9:13 p.m. ET

When Sgt. Alan Van't Land of the Colorado Springs Police Department approaches two young black men in the 2100 block of Preuss Road in Colorado Springs, he tells them he is responding to a call about a possible assault.

He says the men match suspect descriptions and he has been informed one of them may have a gun.

The FDA has approved a new drug that promises a simpler and far more effective treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis. But not everyone is celebrating.

Doctors Without Borders has concerns about a critical bottom-line issue: How much will the drug cost in poor and middle-income countries, where most TB patients reside?

The stakes are so high because the difference between the new regimen — involving a drug called pretomanid — and the current drug regimen is so dramatic.

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