Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in the Central Coastal region of California.

Lettuce from other parts of the U.S. and Mexico is safe to eat, the CDC says. However, if you're not sure where your romaine lettuce came from, err on the side of caution and throw it out, health experts say.

A total of 43 people in 12 states have been infected in this outbreak. No deaths have been reported.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

The situation at the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry has been chaotic and confusing in recent days. And reactions from the American public suggest that photos and footage from the scene serve as a sort of Rorschach test.

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET on Friday

In the global fight against climate change, the United Kingdom has quietly notched an unusual — and somewhat mystifying — victory.

For well over a decade, the country's total energy consumption has dropped steadily. All told, there's been a 10 percent decline since 2002, after accounting for temperature variation.

The trend is widespread, documented in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors (though not, notably, in transportation). It's not tied to economic decline or supply shortages.

An 18-year-old in Hemer, Germany, managed to earn and lose his drivers' license over the course of less than an hour.

He successfully obtained his license on Tuesday and celebrated — how else? — by going for a drive. At nearly twice the legal speed limit.

Just 49 minutes after he earned his license, a police laser speed gun clocked him going 95 km/hr in a 50 km/hr zone — that is, nearly 60 mph in a 32 mph area.

Just like that, his brand-new license was no more.

Updated at 1:33 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Michigan has dropped most of the charges against a Detroit doctor accused of female genital mutilation, concluding that Congress "overstepped its bounds" when it passed a law banning the practice.

That 1996 law violates the Constitution and is unenforceable, the judge concluded, because in general, criminal law is left to the states — and female genital mutilation should be no exception.

Cut Caesar salad off the menu this week: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a multistate E. coli outbreak is underway, and romaine lettuce is to blame.

Thirty-two people are sick, including 13 who were hospitalized; no deaths have been reported. An additional 18 people were sickened in Canada.

Evidence points toward romaine lettuce as the likely source, but the CDC can't get more specific than that.

Authorities in Italy have demanded the seizure of a humanitarian ship used to rescue migrants from drowning in the Mediterranean Sea, alleging that the ship improperly dumped contaminated and medical waste at port — a charge strongly rejected by the nonprofit groups that operate the ship.

Doctors Without Borders and SOS Mediterranee describe the seizure order as an attempt to criminalize humanitarian aid, saying the ship has always followed standard procedure for disposing waste.

Thousands of Guatemalans are evacuating their homes as the Volcán de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, erupts again near the city of Antigua.

The volcano has erupted repeatedly this year. In June, more than 100 people were killed in a violent eruption that spewed lava, ash and rocks over nearby villages.

Carlos Ghosn, the powerful chairman of Nissan renowned for reviving the company nearly two decades ago, has been removed from his position after an internal probe found he underreported his income, the company says.

"[N]umerous other significant acts of misconduct have been uncovered, such as personal use of company assets," Nissan wrote in a statement.

Novelist and screenwriter William Goldman, who wrote the beloved cult classic The Princess Bride and won Oscars for writing All the President's Men and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, has died at 87.

Goldman's son-in-law, Mike Pavol, tells NPR that Goldman died Friday morning in New York City.

His legend was cemented in Hollywood, but Goldman himself was an avowed New Yorker. He was born in Chicago, went to Oberlin College in Ohio, served briefly in the military and got a master's in English from Columbia University in New York.

Updated at 10:28 p.m. ET

More than 1,000 people are listed as missing in the wake of the Northern California wildfire known as the Camp Fire, authorities say. It's a number that has ballooned rapidly and is expected to continue to fluctuate. The Butte County Sheriff's Office had said on Thursday evening there were 631 people unaccounted for.

However, that number may include people who escaped to safety and do not realize they are being searched for.

Updated Friday, Nov. 16 at 11:40 a.m. ET

It sounds like a simple question for a police department. How many Native American women have gone missing or been murdered in a given city? In Seattle, say. Or Albuquerque. Or Salt Lake City. Or Baltimore.

The long-planned repatriation of Rohingya refugees from Bangladesh back to Myanmar is set to begin later this week — and refugees are reportedly fleeing camps to avoid being sent back to the country they fled. Many refugees have said they fear for their lives if they should return to Myanmar.

Aid groups and international organizations have warned that repatriation, given current conditions in Myanmar, cannot possibly be voluntary, safe and dignified.

A 50-year-old farm supervisor has been accused of intentionally planting needles in Australian strawberries, and could spend up to 10 years in prison if convicted.

In September, the repeated discovery of needles stuck inside grocery store strawberries prompted widespread alarm, caused farmers to dump massive quantities and triggered a nationwide investigation.

Eric Schneiderman, the former attorney general of New York who resigned after multiple women accused him of physically attacking them, will not face criminal charges over the allegations of abuse.

Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas says an experienced team of prosecutors and investigators conducted an "exhaustive review" of the facts and the legal landscape.

Emile Ratelband, a 69-year-old motivational speaker from the Netherlands, has petitioned a court for permission to change his legal age — by altering his birth certificate to show he was born 20 years later than he really was.

Ratelband argues that he feels two decades younger than he actually is — doctors told him he has the body of a younger man, he says. While in most cases that compliment is rhetorical, Ratelband is taking a more literal approach. He also says having a younger age on paper would give him a boost in life and on dating apps.

Updated at 1:32 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been hospitalized for "observation and treatment" after she fell and fractured three ribs, a court spokeswoman says.

Ginsburg, 85, fell in her office at the Supreme Court on Wednesday evening, according to the court. After "experiencing discomfort overnight," she went to a hospital on Thursday morning.

Voter turnout on Tuesday was massive: More than 47 percent of the voting-eligible population cast a ballot in the midterm elections on Tuesday, according to early estimates from the United States Election Project.

"Almost half of possible voters actually voted" might not sound impressive. But for a U.S. midterm election, it's a whopping figure. Compare that with just 36.7 percent in 2014, and 41 percent in 2010.

That's the highest turnout for a midterm since 1966, when 49 percent of the population showed up to vote.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

America's 116th Congress is going to include some prominent firsts — and several governors' races also made history in these midterms.

The U.S. has ushered in its first Native American and Muslim congresswomen, its first lesbian mom in Congress and the first openly gay man elected as a governor. South Dakota and Maine elected their first female governors, Tennessee and Arizona sent their first women to the Senate, and Massachusetts and Connecticut elected their first black women to the House.

The hotel chain Motel 6 has agreed to pay $7.6 million to settle a class-action lawsuit after multiple Motel 6 locations gave guest lists to Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents.

Sharing those lists led to arrests and deportations of an as-yet-unknown number of hotel guests.

The settlement deal was tentatively reached in July, but details were not public until this week. The agreement, which still needs to be approved by a federal judge, calls for Motel 6 to pay money directly to affected guests and also to impose tighter controls over private information.

The Department of Justice has once again petitioned the Supreme Court to intervene in pending cases over the future of DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Obama-era program that protects immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

The program is keeping about 700,000 young people from being deported, NPR's Joel Rose notes. At the moment, DACA is accepting renewals but not new applicants. If the program is ended, currently protected individuals could be deported, though it's not clear how quickly that might happen.

The Lion Air plane that crashed into the ocean last week had been experiencing a "technical problem" with its airspeed indicator, and the gauge had malfunctioned on the jet's final four flights, investigators said Monday.

That included three flights that landed safely, as well as the deadly crash on Oct. 29, when Flight JT610 crashed minutes after takeoff from Jakarta, Indonesia, with 189 people on board.

Since she was 12 years old, Sara Murawski has dreamed of buying a house. Specifically, a Craftsman home, with a big front porch.

But she graduated right before the Great Recession. When home values plummeted, she couldn't afford to take advantage of lower real estate prices. She was working in construction, with bachelor's degrees in housing studies and interior design.

"My wages weren't that great," she says. "I just felt really lucky to have a job."

The popular apps Tinder and Bumble have upended dating culture, all with a swipe.

But Tinder's parent company says the similarities between the apps suggest another kind of swiping — of ideas.

In dueling lawsuits, Match, which owns Tinder, alleges that Bumble stole Tinder's intellectual property. Bumble says those claims are bogus, designed to drive down Bumble's worth and "poison Bumble in the investment market," according to Bumble's lawsuit.

Analysts are estimating that Hurricane Michael has caused billions of dollars of damage and will create a substantial loss for insurers, but the industry is expected to cope — once again avoiding the kind of meltdown that Florida saw in the 1990s, after Hurricane Andrew.

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