Noah Glick

Noah Glick is from the small town of Auburn, Indiana and comes to KUNR from the Bay Area, where he spent his post-college years learning to ride his bike up huge hills. He’s always had a love for radio, but his true passion for public radio began when he discovered KQED in San Francisco. Along with a drive to discover the truth and a degree in Journalism from Ball State University, he hopes to bring a fresh perspective to local news coverage.

When he’s not doing radio-related stuff, he’s probably doing crosswords, drinking coffee, playing guitar—or trying to do all three at once. He lives in Sparks with his brother, sister-in-law, two nephews and four animals.

The Mountain West is home to huge swaths of public land. A new web-based tool is now showing people exactly where that land is and which agency is managing it.

Business leaders are seeing climate change as a major risk to their bottom line. And according to a new report, more companies are planning for it.

Worldwide, 72 percent of businesses are preparing for climate risks as part of their overall business strategy. That's true here in the U.S., but that number drops down to 65 percent.

A recent study reports people are more likely to move to recreation-based economies, which can have big implications throughout the Mountain West.

The non-profit research group Headwaters Economics concluded that the recreation economy might be the key to keeping residents in rural counties - and attracting new ones.

In a strong bipartisan message, the Nevada legislature says it will not welcome a proposed expansion of a U.S. Air Force training range into the state's Desert National Wildlife Refuge.

The Air Force is asking Congress to redesignate large swaths of public land for military testing and training. The majority of that request - 227,000 acres - lie within the Desert National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada.

You may have heard of a mysterious 137-year-old Winchester rifle that was discovered in Nevada's Great Basin National Park a few years ago. It sparked worldwide interest at the time. Now, it's found a permanent home.

During childbirth, it used to be routine to cut the vaginal wall to make room for the baby. That's no longer recommended as a standard procedure. However, a new report says it's still performed routinely in some hospitals, including in our region.

Public lands are a haven for target shooting throughout our region. However, many are leaving bullet casings and litter behind, and that's a problem.

Litter from so-called "trigger trash" is leading to lead contamination of soil and costing taxpayers thousand of dollars in cleanup.

Kurt Miers is with the Bureau of Land Management in Nevada. He says this issue is common throughout the region, particularly in areas just outside of cities.

The Department of the Interior is continuing its push to move some agency headquarters out West by asking Congress to fund the initiative.

Interior Secretary David Bernhardt is asking Congress for $10.5 million in the next fiscal year for the relocation efforts. The department says it plans to choose a new western location for the Bureau of Land Management headquarters later this year. It has also signaled that it may move the U.S. Geological Survey headquarters to the Denver area.

In a mostly symbolic move, the U.S. House voted Thursday to stop the Trump administration from exiting the Paris Climate Agreement. Meanwhile, many cities and states in the Mountain West are continuing to warm faster than the national average.

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