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Politics & Government
Boise State Public Radio News is here to keep you current on the news surrounding COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

City Of Boise Lays Out Preliminary Reopening Plan

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Heath Druzin
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Boise State Public Radio
Boise City Council members meet virtually Tuesday to discuss the city's preliminary plans to reopen.

Boise could begin slowly reopening the city starting Friday. But, that will all depend on what Gov. Brad Little has to say and what health experts advise.

 

At Tuesday’s city council meeting, officials discussed preliminary plans to begin lifting restrictions aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19. But the city won’t finalize the plan until Little implements the state’s plan.

The earliest Boise could start relaxing restrictions on some businesses would be Friday, the day after Little’s stay-home order expires. But Mayor Lauren McLean stressed that is a best-case scenario and reopening will only happen when the science backs it up.

“I am very concerned about the likelihood of people arriving en masse at playgrounds, at other facilities when we open on a Friday and so we are going to be very thoughtful about what opens and when,” she said.

And McLean made clear that any city-sponsored events planned for May are not happening.

The city’s preliminary plan largely mirrors the state’s four-phases of re-opening. Places of worship would open up first, followed by businesses like restaurants. Bars and large venues would have to wait until phase four. And all businesses would have to follow social distancing rules for some time.

Even in phase four, the city’s plan only allows for gatherings of up to 250 people. That means big gatherings, like Treefort Music Fest and large sporting events, are likely only possible further down the road.

Underpinning all of this is that much of the recovery relies on residents to continue taking their own precautions — such as social distancing — and that a resurgence of the virus could scuttle plans and send the city back to square one.

Follow Heath Druzin on Twitter, @HDruzin

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