On The Monday, June 17, 2019 Edition Of Idaho Matters

Jun 14, 2019
  • Idaho Supreme Court makes ruling on misdemeanor arrests.
  • Vitruvian Women art exhibit combines classic Da Vinci imagery with contemporary body positivity.
  • Juneteenth commemorates the abolition of slavery and national emancipation.
  • Goat Head Fest celebrates Idaho bike culture and removes prickly seed pods.

- The Idaho Supreme Court ruled last Wednesday that law enforcement officials cannot make a misdemeanor arrest without a warrant or without having seen the crime themselves. The ruling has wide-ranging implications for the legal community, law enforcement and victims and victim advocates. Idaho Matters parses out the legalities of the ruling with Concordia University School of Law associate professor, Jodi Nafzger.

- Everybody is familiar with Da Vinci's ubiquitous image of the "ideal" male physical specimen, the Vitruvian Man. Area artist Chad Estes has gathered the images of 50 women and used the images to show there is no "ideal" physical type in an effort to promote body positivity. "Vitruvian Women" is showing at the Gem Center for the Arts and on Monday we talk about the installation and promoting body positivity with Estes and Tara Price, one of the models for the exhibit.

- June 19, 1865 was the day slavery was abolished in Texas and unofficially throughout the Confederate states. This day, Juneteenth, is the day America commemorates the abolition of one of the darkest stains of our nation's history. Idaho Matters discusses the importance of this observance with state senator Cherie Buckner-Webb and Idaho Black History Museum executive director Phillip Thompson.

-  Boise bicyclists turned out in droves last summer for the first annual Goat Head Fest - a celebration of all things bike and the collective efforts to remove prickly goat head seeds from hiking and biking trails. We talk with event organizer and Boise Bicycle Project executive director Jimmy Hallyburton, Boise Foothills restoration specialist Martha Brabec and Boise State biological sciences professor Trevor Caughlin about biking, brambles and goat heads.