Three Out Of Four Idaho Congressmen Vote Against Bill To End Shutdown

Oct 17, 2013

Credit Courtesy of Sen. Mike Crapo's office

Update, Oct. 17, 9:23 a.m.

Associated Press:

Three of four of Idaho congressional members cast votes in opposition to the hard-fought legislation that ended the partial 16-day government shutdown and averted a potential federal default.

U.S. Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch voted against the bill late Wednesday, as did Rep. Raul Labrador when the House took up the compromise measure.

The only Idaho vote in favor of the bill came from Rep. Mike Simpson, who said he backed the measure to ensure the jobs of thousands of people in his district and statewide.

Last week, Idaho National Laboratory officials said thousands of employees would be laid off if the partial government shutdown lasted until Friday.

As part of the compromise, Republicans and Democrats agreed to reach a budget deal on spending and deficit reduction by December.

Original story, Oct. 16:

Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo says he won’t vote for a new bipartisan deal to end the federal government shutdown.

“I will be voting no because there is no significant fiscal reform," said Crapo.

Democratic leader Harry Reid said Senate leaders reached a deal to avoid default and end the government shutdown this morning.  Crapo says there are some things he likes about the deal, including the fact it will end the shutdown.  But he says it doesn’t address the biggest problem facing the country.

“The real crisis that we face is the debt crisis, where the national debt is now $16.7 trillion approximately and growing," said the Republican.  "We are $2 trillion further down the line then the last time we met this issue.  And very few -- if any reforms -- have been considered, let alone adopted.”

The deal would reopen the government through Jan. 15 and increase the nation's borrowing authority through Feb. 7.  Crapo says that will give Republicans a chance to focus again on the issues of the debt and the health care overhaul.

Copyright 2013 Boise State Public Radio