2020 Election

John Minchillo / AP Images

Gun control has become a topic driving national politics over the last several years. With a 2020 presidential election looming over the political scene, candidates will have to create a compelling argument on a divided issue. Guns & America reporter Heath Druzin attended an event based around the subject of gun control and joins Idaho Matters to expand upon the discussion.

Heath Druzin / Boise State Public Radio

The politics of guns on the national stage are changing. Fast. And when Democratic presidential hopefuls got together in Las Vegas earlier this month to discuss gun policy the shift was crystal clear.

Heath Druzin / Boise State Public Radio

Democratic presidential hopefuls called for increased firearms restrictions at a forum organized by gun control advocates in Las Vegas Wednesday.

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

Boise Mayor Dave Bieter focused more on his record than new ideas in Wednesday’s state of the city address.

James Dawson / Boise State Public Radio

Former Vice President Joe Biden capped off a two-day trip to Idaho Tuesday with a fundraiser at the home of a prominent Boise family.

Gun policy is back on the democratic debate stage in a way it hasn’t been in decades. But are the candidates’ proposals likely to save lives?

Daniel Webster directs the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, and he’s happy that for once, these issues are getting some campaign attention. But he’s also really hoping voters demand proposals based on evidence.

Luis Melgar / Guns & America

Polling shows guns are among the top priorities for many Democratic voters and gun issues remain a big topic in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

On Wednesday and Thursday, 20 candidates will take the Democratic debate stage to talk about a wide range of policy topics. And 20 candidates times dozens of policies equals a lot to keep track of.

It's true that, these being Democratic candidates, there's a lot they all agree on — taking action on climate change, for example, or improving the health care system. But this debate is the first time we'll see them next to each other, coming into direct conflict over what, exactly, they disagree on.

Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

On Tuesday night, Idaho received its first visit of the 2020 campaign for U.S. president.

In front of a boisterous crowd of college Democrats at Boise State University's student union, it was the first time Idaho audiences this year heard this line: "I’m running for president because I think it’s new time for new energy and new leadership."

 


Charlie Neibergall / AP Images

Idaho is preparing to greet its first 2020 presidential candidate Tuesday.

Julián Castro, former mayor of San Antonio and former secretary of Housing and Urban Development, is making a campaign stop in Boise. The Democrat announced his intention to run for president in January.