Arts & Culture

Trey McIntyre Project

Boise's dance world was rocked Monday.

After six years in Boise, the nationally-acclaimed Trey McIntyre Project (TMP) will disband it's full-time dance troupe in July.

Choreographer and artistic director Trey McIntyre will remain in Boise but his focus will shift to include other creative pursuits, like film and photography. Here's more from Monday's press release:

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

April and Andy Davis don’t have many antiques. The couple doesn’t have much money to spend on collecting and they do have a 2-year-old, Hudson, who will pull down anything not nailed to the wall. But April Davis has been watching PBS' 'Antiques Roadshow' since she was a kid.

The popular public television show travels the country to appraise antiques people bring to the event. Some of the antiques, and their owners, end up on the program talking about their treasures and the stories behind them.

Monday is a big day for Mexican-American bakeries across the Northwest. It’s Three Kings Day or the Epiphany: A Christian celebration of the day the magi came bearing gifts for Jesus.

Potato
Courtesy of Sharolyn and Chris Schofield

A year ago, Dylan Cline hosted a dinner party. On the TV was a documentary about New York's famous New Year's Eve ball drop. It gave Cline an idea: What about lowering a giant potato over Boise’s downtown next New Year's? 

His guests laughed at him.

“They were like, 'that’s a fun idea but if it could be done, it would have been done.' So, I took that as a challenge.”

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Boise Contemporary Theater’s Artistic Director Matthew Cameron Clark and Education Director Dwayne Blackaller sit at separate computer screens in a basement office. A passing eavesdropper would find their conversation impossible to follow because it’s part spoken, part typed and all about a fictional world evolving somewhere between their two brains and two keyboards.

Andy Lawless / Boise Contemporary Theater

Boise playwrights Matthew Cameron Clark and Dwayne Blackaller have a little more than three months to curtain on their latest work-in-progress.  The Uncanny Valley, mixes science fiction with Idaho's landscape.

Co-writer Blackaller says most people will likely think the title refers to where it takes place, a valley in Idaho's Sawtooth Mountains. But it’s actually a reference to the themes in the play, not the setting.

You can listen to Blackaller explain what the title means by clicking on the audio player.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Boise Contemporary Theater (BCT) has earned respect producing works by nationally-known playwrights. The company is also demonstrating it can create strong original work in-house.

Early in 2013, BCT debuted A Nighttime Survival Guide. It was written by Artistic Director Matthew Cameron Clark and Education Director Dwayne Blackaller, and it was a hit for the theater.

Boise Contemporary Theater (BCT) is selling tickets for a play that opens in April, but that play hasn’t yet been written. For the next few months, I’ll be following its progress as it goes from idea to rehearsal to an audience.

Boise's Mormon Cannery Serves Beyond Its Church Walls

Dec 23, 2013
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Many churches view feeding the poor as an important responsibility. But none go about it quite like the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Across the country, the LDS church has farms, orchards and ranches. And the crops go to church-owned food processing facilities. Six of these facilities handle perishable food like meat and fruit, including this cannery in Garden City, Idaho.  

At a small Presbyterian church in Richland, Washington, one pastor has been trying to spread a little solace with an unusual exhibit.

Christina Johnson

To make a ballet, choreographer and artistic director Trey McIntyre needs fresh musical inspiration. For this, he turns to Boise musician Kelsey Swope – whose stage name is Grandma Kelsey.

A new movie tells the story of two Mormon missionaries who were kidnapped and held for ransom in Saratov, Russia in 1998. 'The Saratov Approach' details what Andrew Propst and Travis Tuttle went through.

The film opened in theaters throughout the West this fall. Because of it’s success, managers at Boise’s Edwards 22 Theaters have extended the movie’s run until at least December 12.

cat, feline
AlexHubner / Wikimedia Commons

Updated Jan. 10, 2:20 p.m.

The Knitting Factory is sad to report that Lil’ Bub won’t make it to the Boise festival. However, there will be a special appearance by Keyboard Cat and his owner Charlie Schmidt.

StoryCorps

The national project that records and archives oral histories has released a new book detailing stories of gratitude and inspiration, including one story from Idaho you may remember.

StoryCorps is in its tenth year and its latest collection of stories is called “Ties That Bind: Stories of Love and Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps.” 

David Isay founded the StoryCorps project, and says this book is different from past books.

In 1998, two Mormon missionaries, including one from Oregon, were kidnapped in Russia. Their dramatic tale is now the subject of a movie that’s setting box office records in a specific genre this fall.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

You’ll find menorahs all over Dorothy Geffon’s immaculate Boise home. These candelabras are the symbol of the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah. Each night of the eight-day festival, Jews light one candle or oil-light. Some of Geffon’s menorahs are traditional. Others…not so much.

Take the wind-up one that hops around on little plastic legs. “This I have for the little kids,” she says. “It’s fun for the youngest grandchildren.”

Film
Courtesy of http://www.cratermovie.com

The best of this year’s Sun Valley Film Festival (SVFF) screens in Boise Saturday night. The Best of SVFFest will feature two award-winning films; STUCK, about a one-night stand, and Craters of the Moon, which is about a couple who gets lost and stranded in the snow.

Here's the trailer from Craters.

pine tree, christmas tree, national forest
Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

The Christmas tree destined for the nation's capital is set to begin a cross-country road trip. But getting an 80-foot tree out of a national forest isn't quite like going to a U-cut.

This year's Capitol Tree is a carefully chosen spruce from Washington's Colville National Forest. And this is no logging operation. 

For starters, this year's tree is on Kalispel Tribe ancestral land. So on the chilly morning of the cutting ceremony, members of the tribe performed a blessing.

Ballet
Courtesy of Ballet Idaho

Ballet Idaho opens the season Friday and Saturday with four ballets including Akimbo. This ballet comes from Charles Anderson, the artistic director for Company C in California. He was in Boise to select dancers for Ballet Idaho’s Akimbo and teach the steps. 

“It looks like an Olympic event,” explains Ballet Idaho’s artistic director Peter Anastos. “I mean it’s beyond athletic.”   

Jillana, Ballet
Courtesy of Jillana

It's been 30 years since renowned choreographer George Balanchine died, but his ballets and vision are alive through companies like Ballet Idaho. 

For the second year, Ballet Idaho is working with one of Balanchine's dancers, Jillana. Ballet Idaho performs Balanchine's Serenade Friday and Saturday in Boise, nearly 80 years after ballet was first choreographed.

Trey McIntyre Project

Artistic director Trey McIntyre did something unusual when he began to envision a dance performance set entirely to the music of Queen.

“I began really exploring the life of Freddy Mercury and his trajectory and how he came to be as an artist," McIntyre says. "And that’s something that I don’t think I’ve ever done with a composer or a musician; I tend to separate the work from the artist. But in this case, his life became quite fascinating to me.”

personality map
Time Magazine

You may be best suited to live in Idaho if you're agreeable and not very extroverted. That's according to data compiled by a group of multinational researchers who've sliced the United States into distinct regions based on personality types.

The regions were determined by personality test data from more than 1 million Americans. Western states fall mostly in the "relaxed and creative" category, while states on the East Coast are largely deemed "temperamental and uninhibited".

Tami Parr's new book, "Pacific Northwest Cheese: A History," chronicles the origins of cheese making in our region’s grassy, damp, and moldy terroir (or for some of us, the arid, sagebrush grazing lands east of the mountains).

It all began with American Capt. Robert Gray’s milk goat, Nancy. The well-travelled goat perished at sea just before Gray found and named the Columbia River.

The French drama Blue is the Warmest Color opens in U.S. theaters October 25, but you won’t be able to watch it in Idaho, at least not on the big screen.  

Films like this one would usually find a home at The Flicks Theatre, but not this time. 

Carole Skinner, who owns the Flicks, told The Hollywood Reporter, “It isn’t because we’re prudes.”

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter made a recent proclamation that grabbed the attention of the L.A. Times, but flew under the radar of most people in Idaho. On the same day that the federal government shut down and Idaho's new health exchange launched, Gov. Otter declared Oct. 1 "Aaron Paul Sturtevant Day".

Pages