Arts & Culture

Courtesy of Family of Woman Film Festival

Most of the films you’ll see this weekend at the Family of Woman Film Festival in Sun Valley come from overseas. The festival will feature films from Egypt, Democratic Republic of Congo, and India. Only one film comes from the U.S. The Invisible War, which exposed the sexual assaults in the U.S. military. That documentary was recently nominated for an Academy Award. 

Boise Weekly

It’s Wednesday, so that means a new edition of Boise Weekly is out. Today’s paper is the latest work under the new editor Zach Hagadone.  

Hagadone has been reading the Boise Weekly for nearly 15 years. At 32, he's worked with the Associated Press, Idaho Business Review, and even started his own paper in his native Sandpoint.  In a recent interview with KBSX, Hagadone told us that alternative weeklies have been somewhat insulated in the changing world of print journalism.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise was treated to a “secret show” at the Neurolux Monday night. Youth Lagoon, also known as Trevor Powers, kicked off his spring tour with an unofficial concert at the downtown venue.

Guy Hand

If you eat at Rupert’s at the Hotel McCall, you could soon be indulging in some Oscar-worthy food. Chef Gary Kucy received word last week that he is a semifinalist in the James Beard Foundation Awards. That's kind of like being nominated by the Academy.

Chef Gary Kucy has worked with a number of James Beard finalists throughout his career. But he was surprised and humbled to hear that this year, he is one of them.

Treefort Music Fest

If you've been itching to plan your Treefort Music Fest experience, the wait is over. Friday, organizers shared the schedule for the March 21-24 festival.

After making a profile here, festival goers can pick and choose bands they simply can't miss. A personalized schedule gets compiled, and friends who also make profiles can then see yours. Organizers say to "stay tuned" for a Treefort app.

Treefort Music Fest

The final round of Treefort Music Fest acts were announced today. Indie rock band The Walkmen tops the list, joining Animal Collective and Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings as mainstage headliners. The eclectic final group of artists include enigmatic rapper Brother Ali, the orchestral band Typhoon, and emerging local acts like Grandma Kelsey. These groups will perform with about 250 others during the March 21-24 festival. 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise indie rock band Built to Spill is back in Idaho’s Capitol for a series of shows after a tour through the Northwest. Tonight, the 20-year-old band will do something they’ve never done before – play a concert geared toward the under 21 crowd. The band asked that their younger fans get first dibs for tickets to tonight's show.

Brion Rushton has seen Built to Spill more times than he can count.

“They’re hometown favorites – local boys that made it – that made it big time," says Rushton. "Signed to a major label but didn’t ‘sell out.’ ”

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Middleton resident Heath Frisby has made a career out of racing and jumping snowmobiles since he was 14. Now, at 28 he's considered one of the best freestyle snowmobilers in the world.

His sport, though, has been hit by tragedy. Texan Caleb Moore crashed during a jump at ESPN's X Games in Colorado. He suffered a brain injury and later died

Steve Smith Phototgraphy

You can't help but applaud and laugh throughout Ballet Idaho's Don Quixote. ​ The classic ballet debuted Friday night at Boise's Morrison Center. The story centers around two lovers, the innkeeper's daughter, Kitri and the barber, Basilio. Kitri's father catches the couple together and wants Basilio gone. 

Cursive handwriting may soon go the way of the card catalog and the film projector. Schools are moving to new curriculum standards that put more emphasis on typing skills. But not everyone is ready for the cursive alphabet become a relic. The Idaho legislature is considering a statewide cursive mandate.

As far as state representative Linden Bateman is concerned, losing cursive would amount to the dumbing down of society. That's why the Republican from Idaho Falls has introduced a bill to require cursive in elementary schools.

Built To Spill Added To Treefort Music Fest Lineup

Jan 30, 2013

Organizers with Boise's Treefort Music Fest released a fresh batch of band names set to play the March event. In a press release detailing the growing linuep, Treefort planners say the Boise-based Built to Spill will play three nights in a row (March 22-24). 

Idaho Arts Organizations Combine, Celebrate "Wedding"

Jan 16, 2013
Dev Khalsa

A recent merger of two Wood River Valley arts groups has created the largest organization of its kind in Idaho. The merger includes Company of Fools theater company in Hailey and Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Ketchum.

John Glenn is with Company of Fools.  He's thrilled about the merger.

Ben Molyneux

Organizers of Boise’s Treefort Music Fest released the names of more bands today. Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings and Animal Collective are the first headliners to be announced for the March 21-24 event. Festival planners are introducing the bands using quirky online videos.

Idaho Volunteers Honor Veterans' Graves With Wreaths

Dec 14, 2012
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

More than 2,000 wreaths will be placed on the graves of Idaho veterans Friday.  The decorations are part of the annual Wreaths Across America project. 

About 30 volunteers with the Idaho Civil Air Patrol recently gathered at an airport hangar in Nampa to make sure that every grave would have a wreath this year. One of those volunteers was Rhonda Rook. 

When asked about her process for securing fresh evergreen boughs in an old metal wreath frame, Rook laughed.

Courtesy of Mike Medberry

Twelve years ago, Boise writer Mike Medberry took off with friends to hike in Craters of the Moon National Monument in eastern Idaho. 

They camped that night, staying up to recite poetry. Medberry – a longtime advocate of conservation – tells Sadie Babits the next morning he tried to tell more poetry but couldn’t find the words.  He stumbled a bit but didn’t think anything of it as the group began their hike through the lava. Medberry says what happened that day is the basis for his new book “On the Dark Side of The Moon.”

Idaho Botanical Garden

Each year, the Idaho Botanical Garden strings up thousands of twinkling lights, for the annual Winter Garden Aglow.  The event begins tonight.  Last year, we caught up with a dedicated group of volunteers who were putting the final touches on the annual event.  Here’s a look back:

Sadie Babits / Boise State Public Radio

Boise composer Jim Cockey’s newest work debuts tonight in Nampa. Sacred Land is a tribute to the Shoshone-Bannock tribes. Their history, from before settlers arrived in the Treasure Valley to the forced relocation of the tribes to the Fort Hall Reservation in Eastern Idaho in 1869, unfolds through the music.

Sadie Babits / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s capitol city celebrates its 150 anniversary next year. But long before Boise became a city, the Treasure Valley was home to the Shoshone–Bannock people. In the mid-1800s the tribe was forced to relocate to Eastern Idaho.

Their story, from early history to present day, unfolds in a new musical piece called Sacred Land which premiers this weekend.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Classical musicians in Spokane stood outside their theater this weekend, lifting picket signs instead of instruments.

Musicians with the Spokane Symphony are entering week two of a strike over pay cuts. Five concerts have been canceled so far.

Spokane joins a growing list of cities this fall where symphonies have become embroiled in labor disputes -– including Seattle, Chicago, and Philadelphia.

Adam Wallstein is the principal timpanist with the Spokane Symphony.

Idaho Pioneer Celebrated On Dia De Los Muertos

Nov 2, 2012
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Today is the Day of the Dead, the Mexican festival celebrating the souls of dead relatives and friends. In Boise, a unique gathering will honor the life of one little known Idaho pioneer.

Jesus Urquides was a Mexican-American mule packer in the late 1800's. Ana Maria Schachtell is a member of the Friends of Jesus Urquides, a group dedicated to telling the history this mule packer and entrepreneur. She has visited his grave every year for Dia De Los Muertos.  

What It's Like To Be A Mormon Democrat In Idaho

Nov 2, 2012
Rachel Cheney

Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints make up about a quarter of Idaho’s population, and they’re watching Mitt Romney’s presidential bid on the edge of their seats. It’s the closest a Mormon has come to the presidency. But not all are voting for Romney.

Dia De Los Muertos Exhibit Blends Old & New Traditions

Nov 1, 2012
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a time to celebrate the dead and the living together. Traditional festivities in Mexico and Central America honor the soul's of relatives, with the belief that the dead's souls return for a day to eat, drink and celebrate with the living.

The Idaho Historical Museum is hosting a two week long Dia De Los Muertos exhibit. Today's First Thursday art event will include an open house. Off Center Dance Company will also perform a Day of the Dead dance at 5:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. 

Capitol Steps Bring DeMOCKracy To Boise

Oct 26, 2012
Capitol Steps Live
Bill Hurd

In December 1981, Elaina Newport was part of a group of Senate staffers who wrote several parodies and then performed at a holiday get together for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.  As it turns out, that was the birth of the political satire group now known as The Capitol Steps.

“We thought we’d just entertain for the Christmas party and make fun of our bosses and the president,” Newport says. “And we thought surely someone would tell us to stop or fire us, or both.  But nobody did.  And now 30 years later we are still performing all over the country.”

Courtesy Lee Schatz

The new movie Argo is a drama about the CIA’s role in getting six Americans out of Iran in the months following the hostile takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979.  Ben Affleck directed the movie.  He also plays Tony Mendez, the CIA operative who thinks up the plan to get the Americans out.

Courtesy of Jo Deurbrouck

Author Jo Deurbrouck knows rivers. She spent 12 seasons guiding people through Idaho’s whitewater. That life inspired her newest book Anything Worth Doing. It’s the story of two raft guides, Clancy Reece and Jon Barker, who spent a decade together pushing their limits on the Salmon River.

The book, Deurbrouck says began when she learned that Clancy Reece had died. “In 1996, Clancy Reece who was kind of a legendary raft guide in the boating communities of Idaho, the hero of the people who taught me to boat and my hero by proxy… Clancy Reece died.”

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