Boise Foothills

Boise Parks and Recreation

Perhaps no other holiday is more associated with spending the day in a park than the Fourth of July. But this Independence Day is unlike any other, due to COVID-19 which has caused the cancellation of a fireworks spectacular.  That said, the Boise River Greenbelt, all city parks, city-owned golf courses, some of the Esther Simplot aquatic center and more than 200 miles of Boise Foothills trails will all be open.

Molly Wampler/ Boise State Public Radio

75 acres of land were donated to the City of Boise in hopes of preserving wildlife habitats. A Boise couple donated the land near Polecat Gulch Reserve, making it the largest land donation to the city since 2003.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

A Boise park and part of the city’s foothills will officially be renamed in honor of the region’s original inhabitants.

Allison Corona / Boise State University

Many people say hiking in places like Boise’s Camel’s Back trails make them feel less stressed. Now there’s some proof to that theory.

Camel's Back Park North End Trail Entrance
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Ridge to Rivers partnership released a shiny new map of Boise area trails last week. The new map is currently in beta testing while they collect feedback on what features people use the most.

Frank Fujimoto / Flickr Creative Commons

Boise’s trail system might expand, and the Bureau of Land Management is looking for public input on the proposal.

The Boise Foothills Ridge to Rivers system might expand by almost 15 miles in different spots along existing trails. The BLM is looking for public input on the proposal, as some of trails would be on federal land.

College of Idaho/Boise State University

It was close, but a last-minute donation last Friday means a yellow, flowering plant commonly found in Military Reserve will be named Lomatium Andrusianum after the late Gov. Cecil Andrus.


College of Idaho/Boise State University

Friends and neighbors of former Governor Cecil ​Andrus want to preserve his legacy by naming a new species of plant after him.

College of Idaho/Boise State University

Professors at Boise State University and the College of Idaho have found a new species of plant that’s been hiding in plain sight in the Boise Foothills.

Julio Cortez / AP Photo

After controversy over legal vs illegal fireworks in Idaho in the run up to the July Fourth holiday, the Boise Fire Department reports they did respond to fires over the long weekend caused by fireworks.

BFD reports 13 fires on July 4 and July 5. Four were started by fireworks, and five are still under investigation. That is a drop from last year when ten fires were started by fireworks.

Boise Parks and Recreation Department

It’s been a year since last June’s Table Rock Fire in the Boise Foothills destroyed 2,500 acres of wildlife habitat. Sparked by illegal fireworks, the blaze burned and blackened the sagebrush-covered landscape. Over the last 12 months, a group of people and agencies have worked to restore the area.

Martha Brabec says she’s seeing progress when she travels through the burn area. As Boise Parks and Recreation’s Foothills Restoration Specialist, she’s on the front lines of the fire recovery effort.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

In the latest twist over legal fireworks, an opinion from the Idaho Attorney General's office says aerial fireworks can only be sold to someone with a permit for a public display or event. The controversy over sales of bottle rockets and Roman candles heated up after last year’s Table Rock Fire in the Boise Foothills.

 

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

A couple of truckloads of sheep were delivered by truck to 8th Street above the Foothills Learning Center Monday. They are slowly heading north.

For experienced Boise Foothills trekkers, spotting sheep wandering through the scrub and pathways in the spring is not so unusual. But not everybody is familiar with the story of Frank Shirts and his sheep.

Shirts is a real-life sheep rancher with 12 bands (groups) of sheep. That adds up to about 28,000 ewes and lambs each year.

Nicholas D. / Flickr

Zoo Boise is giving a quarter of a million dollars to the city to help protect the foothills. It's all part of the zoo’s conservation mission.

Zoo Boise raises conservation funds to help wildlife in need all around the world. So Director Steve Burns says giving some of that money to preserve the Boise Foothills makes perfect sense.

“This is our backyard,” says Burns.

Burns says people love the foothills, but it’s also a home for a wide variety of wildlife.

Idaho Fish and Game

Parts of the Boise River Wildlife Management Area were closed earlier this year to protect wintering mule deer and elk. The closure included sections of land burned during the Table Rock and Mile Marker 14 wildfires last summer. But May 1, those popular trails in the foothills are expected to reopen.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

You may see some large patches of blue in the Boise Foothills, starting this week. It’s part of a program stop wildfires in the iconic trail system.

The blue dye is an herbicide that crews will apply to manage non-native grasses and problem weeds. Those are the plants that compete with native species and increase the risk of fire.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise Fire Department says it will only respond to life-threatening emergencies in the Foothills where houses are sliding down a hillside.

Officials say the creeping landslide at Alto Via Court has created dangerous conditions. BFD wants Foothills users and curious onlookers to stay away from the site.

Scott Graf, Boise State Public Radio

Final update: Crews reached full containment on the Table Rock Fire at 9 o'clock Thursday evening. Boise Fire officials say crews will monitor the fire through at least Friday to maintain containment. 

Update, 5:35 p.m.: Fire crews continued to make progress on the Table Rock Friday Thursday afternoon. Boise Fire Department officials said just before 5:30 that the fire is now 85 percent contained and that full containment is expected by 10 p.m.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The ground under the Terra Nativa subdivision in the Boise foothills has been slowly sliding for months. Alto Via Ct. has been closed indefinitely. One house has been deemed unsafe to occupy and the fate of others is uncertain. Homeowners have begun the process of suing the developer. We wanted to see first-hand what's happening. This slideshow is what we saw on the afternoon of May 26.

Find Adam Cotterell on Twitter @cotterelladam

Copyright 2016 Boise State Public Radio

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The road is still closed to a Boise foothills subdivision where the land is slowly sliding beneath some high-end houses. We wanted to get a better understanding of what's happening underground. So, we spoke with a long-time Boise geologist. Not many people know as much as Spencer Wood about what’s happening under the grass of the foothills. The now emeritus Boise State University geosciences professor has been writing about the land here for decades.

What are the foothills?

The Boise foothills are soft. They’re almost entirely sand and silt.

screengrab google.com/maps

The ground under the Boise foothills neighborhood called Terra Nativa has been sliding for weeks, possibly months. One house has been deemed unsafe to live in. At least one other has damage. And late last week the highway district closed two roads in the subdivision due to buckling streets and sidewalks and fear of landslides. 

We wanted to know how the city determines if a site in the foothills is safe to build on. Here’s what we learned.

Ridge to Rivers Facebook page

Heads-up intrepid Boise foothills hikers, bikers and runners: time to find an alternate route for your cardio adventures.

The recent rain in the Treasure Valley has wreaked havoc on the trails, making them soft and muddy.

Trail managers are encouraging people to check conditions before they head to the hills this winter. Here's the link to updated trail conditions and alternatives (Boise River Greenbelt, 8th Street Road and Rocky Canyon) from the city's Ridge to Rivers system.   

Land Trust of the Treasure Valley

A group of volunteers will be out in force Saturday to give the Boise Foothills a collective hug. That’s what the YMCA and the Land Trust of the Treasure Valley are calling trail restoration in Harrison Hollow.

“Now and then it just needs some tender loving care, and that’s what we’re doing, we’re lending a hand for the land,” says Rich Jarvis with the YMCA Togetherhood program. He says maintaining trails in the Foothills is no easy task.

BLM

Authorities say a cyclist started a 73-acre wildfire in southwest Idaho by lighting his toilet paper on fire after taking a comfort break.

U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials say the cyclist stopped to defecate in a ravine in the Boise foothills on Wednesday afternoon. The man then lit the toilet paper on fire but lost control of the embers in the dry grass while trying to extinguishing the waste.

Firefighters contained the flames several hours later.

AgriLife Today / Flickr Creative Commons

The city-owned Oregon Trail Reserve is surrounded by homes. After a fast and hot-burning grassfire killed a woman and destroyed homes there in 2008, the Boise Fire Department began looking at new ways to deal with wildfire. The department used a grant from the Southwest Idaho Resource Conservation and Development Council to start using a different strategy: grazing goats to thin fire-fueling plants. 

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