Census

Idaho Governor's Office

Monday was “Census Day” in Idaho and the Gem State is hoping for another strong showing in the upcoming population count.


The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday over whether the Census may include a question about citizenship.

Neil R / Flickr

This week, a California judge ruled against the Trump Administration adding a question to the 2020 census inquiring about immigration status. Should it be included, there are fears it could result in an inaccurate count.

Richard Laymjan / Flickr

A federal judge in New York ruled Tuesday that the Trump Administration can’t ask a question regarding citizenship on the upcoming 2020 census.


A new question on the 2020 census about citizenship is heading to court.  The U.S. Conference of Mayors is filing a suit contesting its inclusion. But not everyone in the region is on board.  

guayacan_verde / Flickr

A question regarding citizenship has already embroiled the 2020 census in controversy. As California sues the federal government over the words, some in Idaho worry the question will leave out a portion of Gem State residents.

Rachel La Corte / AP Images

Between July 2015 and July 2016 the state grew by more than 30,000 people. That's according to the latest census data, and is the biggest increase since 2008.

The 1.8 percent gain comes from people who moved to the Gem State from other parts of the country, and from babies born in Idaho. The state is fifth when it comes to in-migration and seventh for births. Utah topped the list for growth by percentage, followed by Nevada. Other western states like Washington, Oregon, Colorado and Arizona also made it in the top-10 list.  

Recession Delayed Growth In Idaho's Capitol City

Oct 2, 2012
census.gov

A new study from the U.S. Census Bureau shows many people have left the suburbs and moved downtown. That’s especially true in the nation’s largest cities like New York or Chicago which added nearly 48,000 people to its downtown between 2000 and 2010. That didn’t happen in Idaho’s largest city. But that's not because Boise didn’t try.

Fewer Idahoans Have College Degrees

Jul 12, 2012
Graduation Winter Boise State Undergraduates
Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

New numbers from the U.S. Department of Education show fewer Idahoans had college degrees in 2010 than in 2009. Nearly 67,000 residents aged 25-34 had some kind of post-secondary degree in 2010. That’s just under 33 percent of that demographic. And it’s about 1,000 fewer than the year before, or a .7 percent drop. The national average is above 39 percent.