Earthquake

Earthquake Swarm Continues To Shake Central Idaho

Apr 14, 2014
U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey reports a 4.6-magnitude earthquake occurred Monday afternoon 14.2 miles north of Challis. Early Monday morning, a magnitude 3.0 earthquake was measured 11 miles north northwest of the town.

Mike Stickney is the director of the Earthquake Studies Office at the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology. He says this swarm of earthquakes in central Idaho started on March 24. He says at least 12 have been greater than magnitude 3, and many smaller tremors have also been measured.

A 4.9-magnitude earthquake shook central Idaho, flinging items off walls and scaring residents but otherwise producing no reported damage or injuries in the sparsely populated mountain area.

USGS geophysicist Dale Grant says the earthquake was "kind of an unusual occurrence" being the first one of its strength in the area since 2005. But he said even minor damage is unlikely because of the remote location. It struck 8 miles northwest of Challis, a town of around 1,000 less than 200 miles northeast of Boise.

4.1 Magnitude Earthquake Rattles Challis, Idaho

Apr 10, 2014
earthquake, challis
Google Maps

The U.S. Geological Survey says a magnitude 4.1 earthquake has been recorded three miles underground near Challis, Idaho.

USGS monitors recorded the quake at 6:21 a.m. Thursday. It occurred nine miles north-northwest of the town.

Federal scientists say a small earthquake was recorded in Valley County in an area southwest of McCall.

The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting a magnitude 3.1 rattled the county Thursday night.

The quake was recorded about five miles below the surface.

So far, authorities in the central Idaho county have not received any reports of injuries or damage related to the quake.

The earthquake and tsunami threat to the Northwest from the offshore Cascadia fault was in the news in multiple ways Thursday. Canadian researchers have reconstructed a prehistoric record of great earthquakes on that shared fault. It reconfirms that we're due for another Big One.

Coincidentally in Oregon, tsunami preparedness is getting a renewed look.

A series of small earthquakes sent jolts across a corner of southeast Idaho Sunday night. The U.S. Geological Survey says two smaller earthquakes were also recorded inside the boundary of Yellowstone National Park in recent days.

Temblors of 4.2 and 3.6 magnitude were recorded in the Lava Hot Springs area. Authorities say the jolts generated calls from concerned residents, but so far there is no damage or injuries attributed to the temblors.
Both quakes are considered mild and not strong enough to cause severe damage.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Chances are, you've heard the public service announcements that say "It's up to you to be ready. Get a kit. Make a plan..."

For years, emergency managers have urged people to stockpile enough food, water and supplies to last 72 hours after a disaster. In the Northwest, basic assumptions like that are now under scrutiny, especially when it comes to the risk from a big earthquake. Two committees in Oregon and Washington have been working for more than a year to come up with wide-ranging recommendations to improve the region's disaster resilience.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Parts of Washington and Oregon are in the midst of silent earthquakes. You can't feel this so-called "slow slip" quake and it doesn't cause damage. Still, scientists want to learn more about the recently discovered phenomenon.

Little is certain so far, but there's a possibility these deep tremors could trigger a damaging earthquake or serve as a warning bell for the Big One.

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

It's a question all of us face sooner or later: whether to spend a good chunk of money to protect against a catastrophe that has a very low chance of occurring. A workshop that just wrapped up in Corvallis, Oregon considered that dilemma in the context of Northwest dams and a magnitude 9 earthquake.

Northwest States Map Liquefaction Susceptibility

Jul 20, 2012
Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Two major earthquakes last year raised red flags for the Northwest. Some of the damage from those quakes in Japan and New Zealand resulted from a phenomenon called liquefaction. This is when the ground turns to jello or quicksand. Transmission towers topple, buildings sink and utility pipes break. Now, geologists in the Northwest, including Idaho have mapped the spots most likely to liquefy here in an earthquake.

This summer, the sound of hydraulic jacks reverberates through upscale neighborhoods near Tokyo Bay. Look closer, and you'll notice some of the homes here are tilted.

Pages