Environment

Boise Votes To Sell Hammer Flat

Dec 20, 2011

 

Boise’s city council voted unanimously Tuesday to sell Hammer Flat to Idaho’s department of Fish and Game. Each member spoke in favor of the move as the best way to preserve the important winter wildlife habitat. But each councilor also expressed the same reservation.

The issue that gave Boise’s city council pause was recreation. The 700 acre plateau north-east of Boise isn’t just used by deer. It’s popular with hikers, runners, mountain bikers and others. Fish and Game deputy director Jim Unsworth says that won’t change.

Cleaning Up the Boise River

Dec 9, 2011

BOISE, Idaho — In a survey that was conducted for Boise State Public Radio, Idaho Public Television and other public media stations, Northwest residents say their top environmental concern is water quality protection.

Aaron Kunz has more on a river in Idaho, where residents are working to reclaim it from a legacy of pollution.

The survey, conducted by DHM Research, asked what concerned people the most out of ten categories. All three states in the Northwest indicated that water quality is the problem they care about the most.

BOISE, ID - The New York-based greek yogurt maker Chobani announced its plans to build a multi-milion dollar manufacturing plant in Twin Falls this morning.  StateImpact Idaho Reporter Emilie Ritter Saunders has been following the event and talks to Samantha Wright.

Idaho Sockeye Count Exceeds Expectations

Sep 20, 2011
Aaron Kunz/EarthFix

BOISE, Idaho — This year might not be a record year for Idaho’s endangered sockeye salmon. But biologists with Idaho Fish and Game say the returning adult salmon count is already above expectations for the year. They get an idea of those numbers during the annual “Sockeye Roundup.” Aaron Kunz takes us to the roundup to find out how sockeye are doing.

Two dozen people drag a massive net that stretches across the clear waters of the Salmon River. They are helping round up dozens of red sockeye salmon that can’t make it back to Redfish Lake.

Ashley Ahearn/EarthFix

10 years after the tragic events of September 11, securing our borders is still a pressing issue for politicians on both sides of the aisle. But for some in Congress, national security and environmental protection can’t coexist.

A new bill introduced by Representative Rob Bishop of Utah would allow unhindered development within 100 miles of an international border or the U.S. coastline, as long as it can be justified as necessary for national security.

(Ashley Ahearn reports.)

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