Expressive Idaho

  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting president and CEO addresses future of NPR and PBS
  • Expressive Idaho looks at the Western tradition of silversmithing
  • A wicked scary film festival visits Boise
  • Boise Rock School celebrates 10th anniversary

Olivia Weitz

Salmon resident Jeff Minor loves leather. Specifically, he enjoys crafting rawhide into thin, braid-able strips he uses to make bolo ties, hatbands and all kinds of cowboy gear. Olivia Weitz traveled upstate to meet Minor for Boise State Public Radio's Expressive Idaho series and she joins Idaho Matters to tell us about this Western tradition.

  • Ways to break through the downward spiral following eviction
  • Researchers look at storms on Saturn's moon, Titan
  • Boise State Public Radio's 'You Know The Place' begins Season 2
  • 'Expressive Idaho' examines the art of braiding rawhide

Olivia Weitz

Olivia Weitz introduces us to folk artists in Idaho with a series of profiles featuring master folk artists and apprentices in the Idaho Commission on the Arts’ Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program. Today, we look at Boisians keeping the traditions of Indian dance alive.

Expressive Idaho: Indian Dancing In Boise

Jul 31, 2018
Olivia Weitz / Idaho Commission on the Arts

Performers of Indian dance often rely on dramatic facial expressions and hand gestures to entertain and tell stories. Their bright costumes and eye makeup may stand out the most for those who are unfamiliar with the South Asian art form, or have glimpsed it only in Bollywood films. But those expressions and gestures are rooted in ancient Indian folk dance and classical forms like Bharatanatyam: a dance with spiritual qualities that has been performed in South Indian temples for centuries.