FBI

Tom Ahearn / Flickr

The FBI continues to investigate mysterious letters sent to Senator Jim Risch’s offices throughout Idaho.

AP

One member of the Senate Intelligence Committee who questioned former FBI Director James Comey Thursday morning was Idaho’s Jim Risch. Risch opened by complimenting Comey, but the Idaho senator quickly got down to business.

Risch jumped right into his questioning of former Director Comey. Noting his time was limited, Risch said, “I want to drill right down to the most recent dust-up regarding allegations that the President of the United States obstructed justice.”

Rob Howard / Flickr Creative Commons

St. Ann’s Catholic Church in Bonners Ferry burned to the ground last spring. At the time, the loss of the building was estimated to be worth $1 million. Investigators found signs of vandalism in the church after the fire was put out, including a broken statue of Jesus they say was smashed before the fire brought the building down.

Domestic terrorism has taken many forms since the horrific events of September 11th. From these disparate acts, a sinister pattern of domestic terrorism has emerged as American Muslim men and women are radicalized from afar by extremist groups like ISIS.

Peter Bergen, is an internationally recognized expert on terrorism, a documentary producer and CNN’s national security analyst. In his latest book, titled United States of Jihad, Mr. Bergen discusses the social and political influences that can transform average Muslim Americans into homegrown terrorists.

An Oregon man who was arrested after authorities found a machine gun in his trailer is seeking to be released while he awaits trial on federal weapons charges.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports that Michael Emry's attorney filed a motion Friday in federal court in Eugene seeking his release.

The FBI took him into custody in May in John Day, Oregon. FBI and ATF agents searched Emry's trailer, which was serving as his home, and found the weapon.

FBI

Federal officials say an arrest warrant has been issued for a northern Idaho doctor found guilty of illegally distributing pain pills.

The FBI says 62-year-old Rafael L. W. Beier of Kingston skipped the verdict of his federal trial Tuesday and is considered armed and dangerous.

A federal jury found Beier guilty of 66 drug distribution and drug conspiracy charges. The verdict came on the second day of deliberations.

Authorities say that between 2012 and May 2014, Beier sold prescriptions for cash, meeting people at bars, parking lots, stores and in his office.

San Deigo Sheriff's Department

The sister of a man killed in the Idaho wilderness after he was suspected of kidnapping a teen girl and killing her mother and brother in California has filed a claim seeking $20 million from the FBI.

Lora DiMaggio Robinson's lawyer, C. Keith Greer, says James DiMaggio never got a chance for a fair trial before he was shot by FBI agents two years ago.

Greer says he filed a claim with the FBI on Thursday and plans on filing a lawsuit in Idaho's federal court next week.

Authorities in southwest Idaho say one person is in custody and police are searching for other suspects after finding two men and a woman dead amid a violent crime scene in a home in the Boise foothills.

Ada County Sheriff Gary Raney calls the killings "heinous" and says he's never seen anything as bad in his 31 years in law enforcement.

Raney said at a news conference Wednesday that the killings occurred sometime between Sunday evening and Tuesday morning.

He says police are looking for people connected to a 2003 gold Subaru.

Tim Hagen / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho resort towns like Coeur d’Alene, Sun Valley and McCall had higher crime rates than most of the state’s other towns and cities according to the FBI’s annual report of crime stats released this week.

Kevin Wolff, who teaches criminal justice at John Jay College in New York, says many resort towns are in the same boat.

James DiMaggio, Car
Courtesy Ada County Sheriff's Office

Federal and state prosecutors say FBI agents acted reasonably when they shot and killed kidnapping and murder suspect James DiMaggio in the Idaho wilderness last summer.

U.S. Attorney Wendy Olson and Valley County Prosecutor Jay Kiiha made the announcement Wednesday, saying the two FBI agents who shot DiMaggio acted reasonably and should not face charges.

Idaho added mental health records to a national Federal Bureau of Investigations database, making it easier for background checks to discover if would-be gun owners have a history of mental illness.

The Twin Falls Times-News reports gun store customers are asked to complete a form revealing their legal status, criminal history and whether they have been committed to an institution for health reasons or found mentally unfit by a court.

The FBI has taken over the Idaho criminal investigation into private prison company Corrections Corporation of America.

The Nashville, Tenn.,-based CCA has operated Idaho's largest prison for more than a decade, but last year, CCA officials acknowledged it had understaffed the prison by thousands of hours in violation of the state contract. CCA also said employees falsified reports to cover up the vacancies. The announcement came after an Associated Press investigation showed CCA sometimes listed guards as working 48 hours straight to meet minimum staffing requirements.

Table: Emilie Ritter Saunders | Data: FBI

Idaho's crime rates, like the nation's, are on the decline according to the FBI's annual crime statistics report. But a closer look at the recently released data show it's not Idaho's population centers that are posting the highest rates of violent and non-violent crimes -- it's small towns.

Amber Alert, FBI, Cascade,
Joe Jaszewski / Idaho Statesman

The search for 16-year-old Hannah Anderson and her suspected abductor, 40-year-old James Lee DiMaggio, has spanned three states and thousands of miles.

But now that law enforcement officers are at their closest yet to finding the pair, they face perhaps the most challenging search area of all.

CIA-Bound Ricin Letter Found in Spokane

Jun 11, 2013

The fifth letter in a ricin-poisoning investigation, addressed to the Central Intelligence Agency, has been retrieved in Spokane.

The FBI says postal workers in Spokane discovered the letter Saturday when it was returned as undeliverable.

Supervisory Senior Agent Frank Harrill, from the FBI in Spokane, said in an email the letter was addressed to the CIA, and is “similar in appearance to four other letters sent from Spokane last month.” It’s postmarked May 13, written in red ink, and contains the deadly poison ricin. There are no related reports of illness.

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