Food

school lunch, cafeteria, students
Lance Cheung / USDA | Flickr Creative Commons

Most Idaho kids went back to school this week, meaning for many, a return to school lunches. Food in public schools has changed significantly since new federal nutrition guidelines were passed in 2010.

Boise Co-op To Open A Second Store

Jul 28, 2014
boise.coop

The Boise Co-op announced Monday that it would open a second store in the Village at Meridian.

Co-op marketing director Shannon McGuire says two surveys solidified managers goals of opening a second store.

“We asked our shoppers ‘what should we do, where should we go if we considered expansion?’” McGuire says. “And out of that came ‘yes, please do expand and go West.’”

McGuire says survey respondents picked Meridian as their top choice for a second store. The second-most requested store location was Nampa, and McGuire says that could someday become a reality.

Yellowstone, Old Faithful Inn
Yellowstone National Park / Flickr Creative Commons

Yellowstone National Park is looking local and organic for its food service menus.

The park's striving to make 50 percent of its food purchases from within 500 miles of the park or from a certified organic provider by 2016.

Today, about 34 percent of the park's food is local or organic.

But park concessionaire Xanterra finds that supporting local growers while keeping prices low in the nation's first national park can be a challenge.

Dylan Hoffman is director of sustainability for Xanterra.

In the food business, everything comes down to that moment when a shopper studies a label and decides whether to buy or move on. That’s why food producers have a big interest in Washington’s Initiative 522 on the ballot next month.

Tami Parr's new book, "Pacific Northwest Cheese: A History," chronicles the origins of cheese making in our region’s grassy, damp, and moldy terroir (or for some of us, the arid, sagebrush grazing lands east of the mountains).

It all began with American Capt. Robert Gray’s milk goat, Nancy. The well-travelled goat perished at sea just before Gray found and named the Columbia River.

Simplot Plant Sciences

One of the country's leading suppliers of french fries is asking the federal government to approve genetically modified potatoes. The USDA announced the move Friday by the J.R. Simplot Company of Idaho. It would be the only genetically engineered potato on the market.

Simplot has branded them Innate potatoes. The company figured out how to use existing potato DNA to design a spud that’s less prone to dark spots. It also produces less acrylamide when cooked. Acrylamide is a neurotoxin found in many foods. Studies on animals have indicated it may also cause cancer.

apple, fruit
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Not all organic food is created equally. Unlike beef or chicken, apples and pears can be certified as organic, even if they’re treated with antibiotics to prevent disease. Food safety groups are meeting this week in Portland to petition against the practice.

Organic apple and pear growers can use two kinds of antibiotics. You may have taken them to treat acne or tuberculosis.

For apple and pear trees, the antibiotics can cure a disease called fire blight.  Fire blight can devastate an orchard.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

A new farmers market opens Saturday in Idaho’s capitol city. The Boise Farmers Market comes on the heels of a big dust-up with the city’s long-standing market. Now, each side says Boise can support both markets.

Oceiana/Flic

That nice piece of fish you might order at a restaurant or pick up from the grocery store may not actually be the type of fish you think it is.

Guy Hand

If you eat at Rupert’s at the Hotel McCall, you could soon be indulging in some Oscar-worthy food. Chef Gary Kucy received word last week that he is a semifinalist in the James Beard Foundation Awards. That's kind of like being nominated by the Academy.

Chef Gary Kucy has worked with a number of James Beard finalists throughout his career. But he was surprised and humbled to hear that this year, he is one of them.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Kids everywhere will rejoice at this news: broccoli, cauliflower and most leafy greens like spinach and arugula are in short supply these days. Produce managers are struggling to keep their section stocked, and customers are seeing higher-than-normal prices.  A cold snap in Arizona's  Yuma desert is the culprit.

Sammy Duda is with Duda Farm Fresh Foods. He says a warm December meant crops grew too fast, flooding the market ahead of schedule. This created a void when January’s cold temperatures damaged leafy greens.

“This is  not just a West Coast issue,” Duda says.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

When you order that special filet at a restaurant or store, you're often going on trust that the fish actually is what the menu or label says it is. In Washington, two state agencies are asking for tougher penalties to deter seafood fraud.


OLYMPIA, Wash. - When you order that special filet at a restaurant or store, you're often going on trust that the fish actually is what the menu or label says it is. In Washington, two state agencies are asking for tougher penalties to deter seafood fraud.


Investigators for Consumer Reports recently found more than one-fifth of the fish they submitted for DNA identification was mislabeled at the point of sale.


Washington Fish and Wildlife police deputy chief Mike Cenci says the penalties for false labeling need to be stronger.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

 

The USDA this week announced $4-million in funding to help equip more farmers markets with the ability to take food stamp swipe cards.  Idaho’s portion of the allotment is about $45,000. 

According to the USDA,  only ten of the state’s 58 markets have the technology to accept food stamp cards, known as SNAP cards.   

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