Fort Hall

  

It’s called America’s first extreme sport. It’s certainly old … and extreme. Each summer on the Fort Hall Reservation in southeastern Idaho, Shoshone Bannock tribal members gear up for Indian relay. KUER's Mountain West News Bureau reporter Nate Hegyi attended the event early this month with photojournalist Russel Daniels.  

Russel Daniels for KUER

It’s called America’s first extreme sport. It’s certainly old … and extreme. Mountain West News Bureau reporter Nate Hegyi takes us to the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho, where Shoshone Bannock tribal members are gearing up for Indian Relay.

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  • Indian Relay at the Fort Hall Reservation.

Chief Tahgee, Fort Hall, Kindergarten
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

This new kindergarten classroom on eastern Idaho’s Fort Hall Indian Reservation looks and feels much like any other. Tiny tables and chairs fill the room, bright drawings and artwork hang on the walls, and small coats hang on low-to-the-ground hooks. It’s the sound of the classroom that’s truly one-of-a-kind.

About 30 five-and-six-year-olds are learning to speak Shoshone.

“Benna, ne naniha J.J.”

“Ne naniha Miley.”

Courtesy Shoshone-Bannock Tribe | Miss Indian Nations

A 25-year-old Idaho State University student is the new Miss Indian Nations.

Alexandria Alvarez, of Fort Hall, Idaho, was crowned over the weekend during the United Tribes International Powwow, which draws thousands of people each year to the North Dakota capital of Bismarck.

The Miss Indian Nations scholarship pageant is open to all Native American women who are at least one-fourth Indian and are between the ages of 18 and 26. The winner serves as an ambassador for all Indian nations.