Health


How can congregations safely congregate, if at all?

Places of worship all across the country have been wrestling with the question since the coronavirus pandemic took hold.

Courtesy Izabela Ragan

Scientists at Colorado State University have developed a way to make sure blood transfusions don't transmit the COVID-19 virus, according to a new study.

 

Heath Druzin / Boise State Public Radio

There have been more than 40,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases in prisons and jails across 47 states. Only Idaho and Wyoming, as well as Hawaii, have yet to see a confirmed case within the inmate population in state correctional facilities, according to the nonprofit journalist outlet the Marshall Project

 

Sharon McCutcheon / Unsplash

Most of us have never experienced anything like the coronavirus pandemic in our lifetime, and that's especially true for children. The Mountain West News Bureau spoke with five kids about what's on their minds: 6-year-old Emerson, 10-year-old Eleanor, 11-year-old Wren, 11-year-old Brennan, and 10-year-old Olivia. Amanda Peacher shares their voices in this audio postcard.

Jafar Ahmed / Unsplash

The Mountain West News Bureau is taking questions from listeners across the region about the COVID-19 pandemic. If you have a question, email us at mountainwestnewsbureau@gmail.com or give us a call at 208-352-2079 and leave us a message. This service is powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

Brandy Burke / U.S. Air National Guard

This story was powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

Shelby, Mont. is home to a lot of wheat and barley fields, a decent high school football team, and an Amtrak train that passes through town twice a day. It's a place where almost everyone knows everyone. 

"The people here are fantastic," says William Kiefer, CEO of the only hospital in the county that offers 24/7 emergency medical services. "There's a huge sense of community."

So when people began getting sick and even dying from COVID-19, it hit hard. 

Kurt Bauschardt / Flickr Creative Commons

Over the next few weeks, the Mountain West News Bureau is taking questions from listeners across the region about the COVID-19 pandemic. If you have a question, email us at mountainwestnewsbureau@gmail.com or give us a call at 208-352-2079 and leave us a message. This service is powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative. 

Lee/ Flickr Creative Commons

Winter means battening down the hatches to keep out the chilly temperatures. But what if closing windows and doors might boost the risk of inhaling dangerous gases?

Nationwide, more and more people are surviving childhood. But researchers found those improvements might not be as big in rural areas. 

A report last year found that child mortality rates had improved. In fact, nationally, it looked like the country had met its 2020 goals. But then researchers took a closer look.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

What happens when you give organic produce to pregnant women for six months? Until now, no one had tried it. A new Boise State study shows women who ate organic produce had lower pesticide metabolites in their urine than women who ate regular fruits and vegetables. Gemma Gaudette digs into the study.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is out with a report examining health in the Gem State. It ranks Idaho’s 44 counties on a variety of factors centering on wellness. Ada, Blaine and Latah Counties are the three overall healthiest. The Treasure Valley’s Canyon County comes in at seventeen.

According to the report, the rankings are intended to help local governments understand what things effect healthy residents and how long people will live.

As a measles outbreak continues in Washington, Idaho is coping with flu season. The illness shut down entire school districts in the eastern part of the state earlier this month.

City of Nampa

This interview was originally broadcast Monday, July 23, 2018.  

The Healthy Impact Nampa Coalition is looking at growth in their region in terms of cultivating the healthiest community it can. The council is looking at housing, transportation, and especially food access that can impact both the well being of the indivdual resident and the health of the community. We speak with the program's manager about new ways to look at growth.

St. Luke's FitOne

The largest single-day running event in Idaho is scheduled for this Saturday; the St. Luke's FitOne 5K, 10K and half-marathon will allow runners to enjoy the Boise community while bringing awareness to health, fitness and education. Idaho Matters speaks with FitOne's director and race coordinator about the events.

physiciancrossroads.com

AMEN, the Adventist Medical Evangelical Network, brings together physicians, dentists and healthcare professionals to provide free services for homeless and low-income patients. AMEN comes to Boise on September 12-14 to work with uninsured residents. Its clinic director and community outreach coordinator join Idaho Matters to talk about their health services.

How To Live To 100

Jun 5, 2018
thecentenariandiet.com

University of Idaho nutrition professor SeAnne Waite has researched what behaviors allow centanarians to live past 100 years. She joins Idaho Matters to talk about how diet and lifestyle can extend our life expectancy.

Chronic Loneliness Leads To Health Problems

May 31, 2018
iStockphoto.com

Health experts are now finding deleterius correlations between loneliness and human health. With advances in the virtual world, Americans are finding themselves increasingly isolated, creating cocoons of insularity. Studies link loneliness to increased levels of stress and inflammation - the kind that leads to diabetes and heart disease.

On The Thursday, May 31, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters:

May 30, 2018

  • The negative health effects of loneliness.
  • How to talk to kids about school shootings.
  • Little houses that also help seniors.
  • Efforts to preserve Idaho's birds of prey.

Caldwell Elementary School Walks To Better Grades

May 14, 2018

St. Luke's is partnering with schools throughout Idaho to promote healthy lifestyles through walking. The FitOne Boise program provides walking tracks for schools and programs to make exercise fun.  Idaho Matters spoke with FitOne executive director Eric Stride and Leigh Peebles, principal of Lewis and Clark Elementary in Caldwell about how healthy students make smart students.

On The Monday, May 14, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters:

May 11, 2018
EMILIE RITTER SAUNDERS / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO | IDAHO COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE | STOCK

A preview of Tuesday's Idaho primary elections  . . . a look at Idaho's first medical school . . . walking to a fitter community

Healthy People Make Healthy Communities

May 3, 2018

Since 2010, nearly 18 percent of the United States' gross domestic product has been spent on healthcare. Chronic conditions like heart disease, cancer and diabetes are responsible for seven of every 10 deaths in America. Those three diseases account for 75% of the nation's healthcare spending.  

John Westrock / Flickr

The American Lung Association is out with its annual State of the Air report, and the findings about Idaho are mixed.

Idaho Statesman

For the first time, a medical facility in Idaho will be able to collect stem cell and bone marrow donations for use around the country. Previously, donors in the Mountain West had to go as far as Seattle or Denver.

Meriwether Lewis Elementary School / Flickr Creative Commons

Compared to the rest of the country, Idaho kids are less likely to be obese. That’s according to new data analyzed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Paola Kizette Cimenti / Flickr Creative Commons

Just two decades ago, adult obesity rates in states across the country were no more than 25 percent. Now, 46 states have rates above 25 percent, according to a report from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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