Japan

It’s May 1943. The Battle of Attu between American and Japanese forces was raging on the Aleutian island, with an Arctic cold, impenetrable fog, and rocketing winds that combined to create some of the worst weather on Earth. In this unlikely place, a Silver Star-winning American sergeant discovers a Japanese surgeon’s war diary, and finds solace for his own tortured soul.

China is a nation in pursuit of a new role on the global stage. But what implications will those reversing trends have on the US and the rest of the world?


Bill Green / Flickr

A new trade deal with Japan could soon help out dairymen, cattlemen, corn and wheat farmers, among many others.


Bill Green / Flickr

As trade tensions escalate with China, the U.S. appears to be normalizing things with trading partners Canada and Mexico. The shifting relationship is good news for Idaho wheat producers.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

 

Japan has lifted a prohibition on sheep and goat meat.

yf Chan / Flickr

A group of officials in the eastern part of the state were in Japan for a whirlwind trip to foster investment in Idaho.

Courtesy of the Amache Preservation Society

In the spring of 1942, official posters went up across the West Coast and Arizona. All people of Japanese ancestry had one week to report to assembly centers.

It’s been more than 70 years since the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, ushering in the end of World War II. Yet true stories such as the one from today’s guest, Pamela Rotner Sakamoto, remind us how much history still has to teach us, and why personal accounts remain so powerful.

This Reader's Corner interview was originally broadcast in September of 2013.

The power of sports to mend rifts between nations and establish bonds of friendship and understanding was put to the test in 1934, when a group of Major League baseball players – including Babe Ruth – traveled to Japan to play a series of 18 exhibition games in 12 cities.

flickr/jonny boy

Japan has temporarily suspended white winter wheat purchases from the Pacific Northwest.

The Japanese Ministry of Agriculture announced the move in response to a report that U.S. regulators found genetically modified wheat on an Oregon farm.

Reuters reports South Korea has also suspended U.S. wheat imports.

Molly Messick / StateImpact

Before the recession hit, the sawmill in the North Idaho town of Laclede was known for its reliability.  It had never seen a shutdown, not in Steve Spletstoser’s nearly 30 years of working there.  Then came 2008.

It was really eye-opening to see,” Spletstoser says.  “Your livelihood is hanging in the balance.”  Day after day, the mill cut lumber, and day after day it piled up.  Very little left the lot.

Northwest States Map Liquefaction Susceptibility

Jul 20, 2012
Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Two major earthquakes last year raised red flags for the Northwest. Some of the damage from those quakes in Japan and New Zealand resulted from a phenomenon called liquefaction. This is when the ground turns to jello or quicksand. Transmission towers topple, buildings sink and utility pipes break. Now, geologists in the Northwest, including Idaho have mapped the spots most likely to liquefy here in an earthquake.

This summer, the sound of hydraulic jacks reverberates through upscale neighborhoods near Tokyo Bay. Look closer, and you'll notice some of the homes here are tilted.

Japanese Dock Washes Ashore in Newport

Jun 6, 2012

The Japanese consulate has confirmed that the dock that washed ashore Tuesday at Agate Beach near Newport is debris from the March 2011 Tsunami in Japan. It was checked for radiation and results came back negative. 

The dock is 7 feet tall, 19 feet wide and 66 feet long. A plaque attached to the top has Japanese writing on it.

Chris Havel with Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation says a picture of the placard has been sent to the Japanese Consulate in Seattle for translation.