LGBT

Idaho Statesman

Idaho Education News reported Monday that only 21% of Idaho School Districts protect both sexual orientation and gender identity through their policies. Slightly larger percentages protect sexual orientation or gender identity individually.

 

ADAM COTTERELL / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints announced on Thursday it is reversing a controversial 2015 policy that labeled church members in same sex marriages as "apostates" and barred children of same sex couples from receiving blessings and baptisms. The church's president, Dallin Oaks, reiterated that the church still considers same sex marriages within the church "a serious transgression." On Friday's Idaho Matters, we speak with Sunny Smart, an inactive member of the LDS Church and an advocate with Affirmation, a nonprofit support group for LGBTQ/SSA Mormons and their families.

  • Idaho courtrooms are facing a shortage of reporters.
  • The Land and Water Conservation Fund gets permanent funding.
  • Survey finds LGBT+ students feel unsafe in school.

Local Gay Bar To Become Boise Police Station

Oct 18, 2018
Lucky Dog, Lucky Dog Tavern, gay bar
John Sowell / Idaho Statesman

Boise City Council has signed off on turning one of the city’s few gay bars into a new police substation.

 

 

Idaho Republican Candidate Discusses Conservative Identity

Jul 11, 2018
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This year's Idaho Republican Convention stuck pretty much to script until 26-year-old Dom Gelsomino took the floor and introduced himself as a "Christian, a fellow conservative and Idaho's first openly gay Republican to run for office." 

On The Wednesday, July 11, 2018 Edition Of Idaho Matters:

Jul 10, 2018

  • Re-evaluating treatment of post traumatic stress for first responders.
  • Idaho's first openly gay Republican candidate talks about the GOP of 2018.
  • A new entertainment plaza opens in Caldwell.

Idaho's Biggest Pride Festival This Weekend

Jun 15, 2018
Jasn / Flickr

Boise’s Pridefest gets underway today. The event has grown from a potluck-style get together in a park to a two-day takeover of the city’s downtown. Attendance is expected to be high, and a range of new sponsors have signed up to back the event.

Response To SCOTUS Ruling On Colorado Baker Case

Jun 5, 2018
CREDIT TOM MICHAEL / BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

The United States Supreme Court ruled on the case of a Colorado baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, citing acknowledging the same-sex union violated his religious belief. 

Frank Augstein / AP

Ruthie Robertson was an adjunct professor of political science at BYU-Idaho and is a lifelong member of the LDS church. However, after posting a pro-LGBT statement on her Facebook page and refusing to retract it, she was fired from her position at the private religious university.

 

 

According to Salt Lake City’s KUTV, Robertson posted on her personal Facebook page June 5th to recognize LGBT Pride Month. In part of her post, Robertson said:

Pride Flags
Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

Boise’s Pride Festival is underway at Capitol Park. The annual event celebrating the state’s LGBT community has expanded to two days this year.

As traffic zooms past, Pride Festival board member Joseph Kibbe climbs a ladder up to the light posts lining leafy Harrison boulevard.

Kellie Parker / Flickr Creative Commons

Law enforcement officials say they are investigating after a gay pride flag was found burned in front of a Boise home.

According to Boise police, an unknown suspect damaged a gay pride flag displayed outside a Boise home sometime between during the evening of June 10 and the morning of June 11. Police say that the owners were displaying the rainbow flag in support of Boise's pride week.

The case is being investigated as malicious harassment. Idaho doesn't include sexual orientation and gender identity in its malicious harassment law.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Proponents of laws that bar transgender people from using public bathrooms and dressing rooms that conform to their gender identity are already seizing on an incident in eastern Idaho this week. A transgender woman is accused of taking pictures of a woman changing clothes in a Target dressing room in Ammon.

Boise transgender activist Emilie Jackson-Edney says it’s wrong to judge all transgender people by one person’s actions. But she says that will probably happen anyway in this case.

Kyle Green, Idaho Statesman

Organizers say after a gunman killed 49 people at a gay bar in Orlando last week, Boise's annual LGBT celebration known as Pridefest could go a couple of different ways. Fewer people might show up this weekend for Pridefest because of fear of anti-gay violence. Or, more people might turn out to show solidarity with the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Hundreds of Idahoans have attended vigils across the state to honor the victims of a mass shooting at a gay night club in Orlando.

More than 200 people attended Sunday's vigil in Boise, while large crowds were also reported in Twin Falls and Moscow.

A vigil in Sandpoint will take place Monday evening, while another vigil will be held in Pocatello on Thursday.

Authorities say the shooting early Sunday left 50 people dead — including the gunman — and injured more than 50 others.

Boy Scouts of America

The Boy Scouts of America lifted its ban on gay troop leaders and volunteers Monday. The controversial ban was something some conservative groups in Idaho wanted to keep in place. However, many religion-based troops are expected to take advantage of a compromise that's expected to result in few actual changes. 

Kellie Parker / Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this week, Latah County officials voted to update their employee handbook to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. The rule only applies to LGBT people who work for the county, and not the entire population.

“At this point it’s not on our agenda to take that up, although it could be," says Latah County Commissioner Tom Lamar. "It could be talked about more.”

Northwest politicians reacted Friday to the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that legalized gay marriage in all 50 states.

    

A new lawsuit in Idaho claims the same legal argument that paved the way for gay marriage in the state should also make it illegal to refuse to hire gay people.

An Idaho Republican lawmaker's political website has been snapped up by a group claiming to be gay rights activists, decorated with rainbows and replaced with text requesting that the legislature meet with same-sex marriage supporters.

State Rep. Paul Shepherd from Riggins is backing a non-binding resolution urging Congress to impeach federal judges who violate the U.S. Constitution. Shepherd contends that recent court rulings overturning state bans on same-sex marriages violate the Constitution.

Jonathan Hull / Flickr Creative Commons

A landmark Utah proposal protecting gay and transgender individuals has passed its test at the state Legislature.

A Republican-controlled state Senate committee voted unanimously Thursday morning to support the bill, sending it to the full Senate for a vote.

The bill, which has earned the rare stamp of approval from the Utah-based Mormon church, bars discrimination against gay and transgender individuals while protecting the rights of religious groups and individuals.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

After more than 20 hours of public testimony, the Idaho House State Affairs Committee decided to kill the "Add the Words" bill that would ban discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) Idahoans.

The House State Affairs Committee —made up of the Legislature's most conservative lawmakers— voted 13-4 to hold the bill in committee. Democrats voted in favor of the bill.

Opponents of a gay rights measure in Idaho are highlighting what they call the “bathroom” problem.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Thousands of Idahoans have flocked to the Statehouse to testify in front of lawmakers concerning a bill that would include sexual orientation and gender identity protections to the state's Human Rights Act.

The legislation, commonly called the "Add the Words" bill, had been denied a public hearing for nine consecutive years.

Kyle Green
Idaho Statesman

For the first time in nine years, supporters of the "Add the Words" movement will get the chance to testify in front of lawmakers. On Monday, the House State Affairs Committee will hear HB 2 beginning at 8 a.m.

Predicting what lawmakers will focus on during the Idaho legislative session is a bit of a gamble. But after eight terms in office, Brent Hill, R-Rexburg, has a good idea of the Legislature's priorities -- after all, he has a big influence in shaping that agenda. Hill, who is the President Pro-Tem of the Senate, points to education and gay rights issues as topics  front and center for lawmakers this year.

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