Media

If the rest of 2020 is any indication, Election Day 2020 is going to be a wild ride. Information — and mis-information — will be flying fast on traditional and social media. Reports and rumors from across the country are bound to stoke uncertainty and concern. It has never been more important to know what to look for, where to look for it, and how to parse all the information coming at you.

 


Creative Commons CC0

As the CEOs of Facebook, Google and Twitter faced a new round of criticism from U.S. lawmakers, scholars are pointing to the growing need of so-called "news literacy" in the run-up to the 2020 election. Boise State professor Dr. Seth Ashley, author of "News Literacy and Democracy," is an expert on the media landscape.

In "Sunny Days," through rigorous research and extensive interviews of key Sesame Street figures, bestselling author David Kamp has produced a fun and fascinating work of cultural history.


In Up All Night, author and journalist Lisa Napoli tells how we went from an age of nightly news broadcasts on three national networks to the age of 24-hour channels and constantly breaking news. The answer—thanks to Ted Turner and an oddball cast of cable television visionaries, big league rejects, and nonunion newbies—can be found in the basement of an abandoned country club in Atlanta. Because it was there, in the summer of 1980, that this motley crew somehow, against all odds, launched CNN. 


This story was powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

Fake news and misinformation about the pandemic run rampant these days. One of the culprits is the Sinclair Broadcast Group, which owns more than a dozen popular television stations across the Mountain West.

 

In 2016, following a contentious Presidential campaign season, City Club of Boise partnered with the National Institute for Civil Discourse to organize a series of events exploring civility in our public discourse. The goal of this project, to paraphrase City Club founder Dottie Stimpson, was to "get people to start talking" to each other, and to chart a course for communicating outside of traditional partisan lines.

Now, nearly four years later, we appear to be at another test of civility. The 2020 Presidential election and a global pandemic of historic proportions are once again challenging elected leaders and citizens to talk to each other-- not at each other.


Lucky Us Film / Narrative TV Initiative

 


The Narrative TV Initiative is a Boise State University program that gives students real world experience in the television production process through the creation from start to finish of a show. 

boisedev

BoiseDev.com began as a Twitter feed in 2013 and quickly evolved into one of the top sources of business and development news in the region. Veteran TV newsman Don Day has been managing the site since its inception and he joins Thursday's Idaho Matters to talk business, media and the growing Gem State.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Wealthy titans of industry and power brokers are set to descend on Sun Valley this week for the 36th annual Allen & Co. conference.

Idaho Student Journalists Tackle New News Media

May 8, 2018
JESSICA ROBERTS

News media has changed drastically since the beginning of the 2016 presidential election. Fake news, Russian bots, data mining and targeted news have changed the way front-line reporters get their content to consumers. 

This interview was originally broadcast in January, 2018.

For most of its history, America has struggled to maintain a balance between fantasy and fact. According to today’s guest, Kurt Andersen, our country is now in a moment where we feel entitled to believe whatever we want, regardless of the evidence. How this happened, and why we should be concerned, is the subject of his book, Fantasyland, How America Went Haywire, A 500-Year History.  


Stephen Voss/NPR

Robert Siegel has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered for more than 30 years. His voice has become familiar sound for listeners on their afternoon drive home, here in Idaho and across the country.

In 1961, the world watched as tensions flared and the Berlin Wall went up, trapping East Germans inside a Communist regime. What was less well known was what was happening under that wall. Away from the glare of television cameras and public demonstrations, defectors and West Germans engaged in clandestine efforts to build tunnels and help East Germans escape.

Washington, Lincoln and FDR are revered as leaders who helped shape the course of history. They are often referred to as “great” presidents. But is it possible to have a great president today? And is greatness a quality that Americans even want in their chief executive?

Aaron David Miller examines the history of the U.S. presidency to explore those questions in his book, The End of Greatness.  In the book, Dr. Miller makes the case that greatness as a presidential virtue is largely overrated – and that it occurs too infrequently to be relevant to current politics.

Domestic terrorism has taken many forms since the horrific events of September 11th. From these disparate acts, a sinister pattern of domestic terrorism has emerged as American Muslim men and women are radicalized from afar by extremist groups like ISIS.

Peter Bergen, is an internationally recognized expert on terrorism, a documentary producer and CNN’s national security analyst. In his latest book, titled United States of Jihad, Mr. Bergen discusses the social and political influences that can transform average Muslim Americans into homegrown terrorists.

The Lewiston Police Department will no longer allow its officers to speak to reporters over the weekend under a newly implemented policy.

Police Chief Chris Ankeny tells the Lewiston Tribune that the change is needed because there is not enough staff available to answer press inquiries between Friday and Sunday.

Previously, officers fielded calls from reporters at their convenience during weekends. However, under the new policy, reporters must arrive at the crime scene to get information about the incident.

PBS

When asked about Idaho Public Television, Paula Kerger responds like a proud parent. The PBS executive says the station is the most watched in the country per capita, and points to the award-winning local programming as a reason why. 

But when it comes to the strength of the system across the country, Kerger admits the fragmented media landscape and shifting platforms has made things confusing for public TV at times.  

screen grab builtinboise.com

A new online media project called Built in Boise launched last week. Its purpose is to tell the stories of local companies doing interesting things.

The website's first stories included a husband-and-wife team who sell gourmet donuts, a game designer, and a banker-turned-paddle-board mogul.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

During President Barack Obama's speech at Boise State, he bragged about innovation taking place in Boise and on the BSU campus. At least 5,000 people heard his remarks firsthand. But a lot of people who wanted to be there couldn't. The White House limited the number of tickets available. And, as Adam Cotterell reports, those who watched Mr. Obama on TV, may have actually had a better seat than those in attendance.

http://idahopoliticsweekly.com/

Idaho political junkies have a new option for getting their news. Idaho Politics Weekly launched Monday, right before the state legislative session kicks off Jan 12.

But unlike other traditional media outlets in the Treasure Valley, the website and newsletter are sponsored by Utah-based Zions Bank.

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