Minidoka

Timelapsed / Flickr

Tuesday we told you how much money national parks bring into the Mountain West. Now, we talk about Idaho.

Wing Luke Asian Museum, the Hatate Collection / The National Archives / Bamboo and BArbed Wire-Facebook

Bamboo and Barbed Wire documents the stories of Japanese-Americans interned at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Jerome County, Idaho and looks at parallels to current evetns. The film is premiering at The Egyptian Theatre and Idaho Matters talks with the film's director, Karen Day, and Katie Hirai, president of the Boise Valley Japanese American Citizens League and granddaughter of Katherine Chizuru Hirai, a Minidoka internee.

On The Monday, April 8, 2019 Edition Of Idaho Matters

Apr 5, 2019

  • Talking about the birds and bees with kids without cringing.
  • Marc Johnson chronicles the life of a prominent Montana rapscallion.
  • A documentary about the Minidoka internment camp debuts at The Egyptian.

New Idaho Airport Planned For Mini-Cassia Area

Jun 9, 2017
Adam Reeder / Flickr

A plan is in the works for a new Mini-Cassia Airport. The current airport in Burley will be shut down because it doesn't meet safety standards.

Studies find the Burley airport to be one of the most dangerous in the state because of its location; it's surrounded by hazards and obstacles like the Snake River, a highway, grain elevators and trees just to name a few. In addition to that, the runways are too short for the planes that use the airport.

Robert C. Sims Collection on Minidoka and Japanese Americans / Special Collections and Archives, Boise State University

Sunday was the Day of Remembrance. Each year, organizers look back at a dark period of history in the American West - the internment of Japanese-American citizens during World War Two. Monday Idaho remembers the role it played in this history.

February 19, 1942 marks the date President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered Japanese people to be interned in the U.S. after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Close to 117,000 Japanese Americans were segregated into government camps, including at the Minidoka center in Idaho. There 10,000 people were held for three years during the war.

Robert C. Sims Collection on Minidoka and Japanese Americans / Special Collections and Archives, Boise State University

Sunday marks the 75th anniversary of President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing the Executive Order that authorized the internment of Japanese people in America during World War II.

Two months after Pearl Harbor, the order relocated 117,000 Japanese Americans into camps. Idaho’s Minidoka site housed 10,000 Japanese for three years. Once the war was over, no one wanted to talk about the internment.