Music

Helado Negro On 'How You Smile'

4 hours ago

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"I'm feeling things! This is awesome!" Emily King describes the moment she stood outside with tears in her eyes, and sang aloud the lyrics to the first song she wrote for her new album. That song is called "Remind Me" and it captures the renewed inspiration King found after packing up her New York City life, learning to drive and moving to a small town in the Catskills.

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(SOUNDBITE OF DICK DALE'S "BANZAI WASHOUT")

Throughout the course of her career, Jenny Lewis has worn many hats. She was a child actor who did cereal commercials and Barbie ads then moved on to films like Troop Beverly Hills and The Wizard. In 1998, Lewis became front woman for Rilo Kiley and when that band officially broke up in 2014, she went solo.

We tried something new this year at the annual SXSW Music Festival. We tracked down a bunch of Latin musicians, put a microphone in front of them wherever we find them and then ask them about their music.

To do this, I needed help so I called in Alt.Latino contributors Marisa Arbona Ruiz and Catalina Maria Johnson.

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Nearly four years have passed since Tame Impala's Currents, a glitter-dusted masterwork of astral rock music th

Between 1997 and 2000, a band from San Jose released two albums, an EP and a couple 7"s of slow, spacey rock, then more or less vanished. Not that the disappearing act took much effort. Duster wasn't exactly a band with a public presence, playing few shows, lending few interviews and releasing little information about its members. The members of the trio went on to play in other bands and work on other projects. In 2000, the founder of Up Records, who released Duster's music, died; operations at the label ended shortly after, and Duster's records went out of print.

When you're facing a crowd that's been sitting for three and a half hours, you might as well get everyone up and dancing. Leikeli47 was the ninth and final Tiny Desk Family Hour act to take the stage at Austin's Central Presbyterian Church during SXSW last week. So naturally, the charismatic, genre-smashing masked rapper closed NPR Music's big night with as much intensity, joy and free-wheeling fervor as the moment required.

It's a packed release week with a whole bunch of notable albums to highlight, including the rock guitar heroics on Ex Hex's It's Real, the wistful wisdom of Jenny Lewis, Andrew Bird's "finest work yet," mind-blowing sonics from the genre-bending composers Emily Wells and Lafawndah, the German electronic artist Apparat and much more. Hosts Robin Hilton and Stephen Thompson share their top picks for the best albums out on March 22 on this episode of New Music Friday.

Featured Albums:

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All right. Unless you're a Patriots fan, this last Super Bowl was a bore. The halftime show starring Maroon 5 was also pretty forgettable.

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On his last album, Are You Serious, the always inventive Andrew Bird drew inspiration from monumental moments in his own personal life, including getting married and having a son. And now, on My Finest Work Yet, Bird zooms way out on humanity across history's timeline, seeking insight about our current age, in a way he hopes "stays above the news feed noise."

Greensky Bluegrass On Mountain Stage

Mar 21, 2019

The Kalamazoo-based quintet that make up Greensky Bluegrass have roots firmly clenched in traditional bluegrass. Yet the group's music balances the time-honored conventions of the genre with progressive tendencies, creating an intoxicating effect that has built a wide and appreciative fan base.

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The Thistle & Shamrock: Best Of The Best

Mar 21, 2019

Take some of the most well-loved names in the world of Celtic music — Paul Brady, The Chieftains, The Bothy Band and Capercaillie — distill their recordings down to a pure essence and what do you have? The crème de la crème, the best of the best.

"Black Glass" beautifully exemplifies what has always made Nick Waterhouse so appealing as a performer. His collaborative spirit shines through as he yields the stage to his spectacular horn section and a percussion breakdown for the ages, all the while maintaining a loose, easy control over his composition. Despite the lyrics relaying something of a cautionary tale, the music is pure escapism — swaying underneath the stars on some remote beach during a different decade-type escapism.

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