Pesticides

Agriculture, sugar beets, harvest
drhenkenstein / Flickr Creative Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency under the Trump administration has announced that farms can continue to use a common agricultural pesticide, despite documented health risks.

 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

What happens when you give organic produce to pregnant women for six months? Until now, no one had tried it. A new Boise State study shows women who ate organic produce had lower pesticide metabolites in their urine than women who ate regular fruits and vegetables. Gemma Gaudette digs into the study.

  • Teton School District drops its mascot.
  • Getting in the water this summer? How to be safe.
  • Organic research on pregnant women in the Treasure Valley.
  • Boise has a new Cultural Ambassador.

Protecting Idaho's Seasonal Agricultural Workers

Jun 3, 2019
UC Davis

Twenty farmworkers in Caldwell were taken to the hospital with flu-like symptoms; the workers were clearly exposed to a chemical of some kind and the EPA is currently investigating the contaminations. Many of Idaho's farm workers are migrant seasonal employees — undocumented and frequently exploited.

Barry Crabtree / Flickr Creative Commons

State budget writers have approved allocating $526,900 to help research and dispose contaminated fields in eastern Idaho.

The request, made up of both state and federal funds, is part of an ongoing effort to treat the negative impacts of a pesticide known as methyl bromide, applied on potatoes in Bingham and Bonneville counties in 2006

Brad Smith / Flickr

Honeybees are dying off at an alarming rate. For several years, scientists have been looking at a number of factors that may be influencing their survival. Now, a University of Idaho scientist has found a working model that may explain why honeybee colonies collapse.

UI professor Brian Dennis built a mathematical model that shows the size of the beehive may be the critical factor in colony collapse disorder. That’s when too many bees in a hive die or disappear and the hive falls apart.

Kara Stenberg / Flickr

Southern Idaho gardeners and farmers are seeing an increase in voles, and the destruction they can cause, this year.

Voles are four-to-five inch long mammals, often mistaken for mice, that like to eat green vegetation.

“It’s a big problem in southern Idaho,” says Ronda Hirnyck. She’s the University of Idaho Extension pesticide specialist in Boise.

Ryan Wiedmaier / Flickr Creative Commons

A Boise State University professor wants to make it easier to decide whether it's worth it to spend a little more on organic produce, or purchase the cheaper non-organic option.

"Eighty percent of American grocery stores now sell organic food and people have to decide for themselves is this worth it to buy to feed myself and my family?" says Cynthia Curl. "We don't have a lot of guidance to give to those people and so I think it's a really important thing to study."

Flickr/agit-prop

Three environmental groups will make the case in court Monday that the Environmental Protection Agency has failed to act on their petition to the agency to ban a common pesticide, chlorpyrifos.