Race

This is an encore presentation.

On February 18, 1965, an overflowing crowd packed the Union at England’s Cambridge University to witness a historic televised debate between James Baldwin, the leading literary voice of the civil rights movement, and William F. Buckley Jr., America's most influential conservative intellectual.


Elaine Thompson / AP Images

 

Since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis two weeks ago, protests demanding an end to police brutality and racial injustice have swelled across the country. Of course, the right to peacefully assemble and petition the government are both protected rights under the First Amendment.

Madelyn Beck / Boise State Public Radio

 

For the last week, protests have been held across the United States over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died at the hands of white police in Minneapolis last Monday. All four officers involved were fired after the killing but only one former officer has been charged in connecton with his death. 

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Unlike in previous years, anyone can enter this year’s Greenbike Race at the Twilight Criterium. The race, which takes place right before hundreds of professional cyclists race around downtown Boise on July 13, will have cash prizes for the top three finishers in both the men’s and women’s divisions.

 

This encore interview originally aired in October, 2018.

America in 1859 was a country on the verge of Civil War. Abolitionists and pro-slavery forces battled it out in the nation’s newspapers, activists were advocating revolts while southerners were talking secession, political parties were splitting down the middle, and a little-known senator named Abraham Lincoln was just coming into prominence. Against this backdrop, Charles Darwin’s pioneering work of evolutionary theory, The Origin of Species, landed like a bomb.


In 1906, an African native known as Ota Benga was displayed in a cage in the monkey house at the Bronx Zoo. Thousands came to view the sensational exhibit. They shouted, pointed fingers, and laughed at the man, who stood 4 feet 11 inches in height and weighed 103 pounds. A sign outside the cage described him as an African Pygmy from the Congo Free State, and announced that he would be exhibited each afternoon during September. An orangutan shared the space with Benga, at times perching on his shoulder.

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Three men police say targeted two youths in a racially-based attack are facing felony hate crime charges.

Boise police arrested 29-year-old Christopher Daniel, 48-year-old Verdell Daniel and 27-year-old Thomas Caldwell on Sunday. All three have been charged with felony malicious harassment. Caldwell also faces misdemeanor battery and driving under the influence charges, and Christopher Daniel faces felony and misdemeanor battery charges.

Idaho State Historical Society

The University of Idaho is set to open its new law center at the renovated Old Ada County Courthouse later this summer. But university officials want to cover up a controversial mural depicting the hanging of a Native American by white settlers. Historians, though, don't want that to happen. 

In the last week, Spokane, Washington, has severed most of its official ties with Rachel Dolezal, the local civil rights leader who gained national infamy for lying about her race.

The head of the NAACP chapter in Spokane, Washington, is facing questions about whether she lied about her racial identity, with her family saying she's white but has portrayed herself as black.

Rachel Dolezal tells The Spokesman-Review newspaper that it's a complex issue, saying, "I don't know that everyone would understand that."

She's president of the civil-rights organization's local branch, an adjunct professor at Eastern Washington University and chairwoman of Spokane's police overnight board.

The Idaho Court of Appeals has vacated a black man's sex crime convictions against two white female teenagers because the prosecutor interjected race in closing arguments by quoting lyrics from the Confederate anthem "Dixie."

All three judges agreed that Canyon County Deputy Prosecutor Erica Kallin erred in citing a song praising what the judges called pernicious racism, and that it might have influenced the jury.

Courtesy Futuro Media Group

It’s estimated that by 2043, white Americans will no longer be a majority of the U.S. population. But in Coeur d'Alene, Caucasians already make up a whopping 92 percent of the population. Nationally, whites total 63 percent of the population.

Coeur d'Alene has been homogeneous for the last 20 years as nearly 90 percent of new residents were white.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Two Boise men have been indicted on federal hate crime charges for allegedly assaulting an African-American man last year. U.S. Attorney Wendy Olson says the victim, known in court documents as D.L., was severely beaten in October 2013 at the Torch 2 Lounge in Boise. Authorities are not releasing the victim's name or age to protect his privacy.

Jonathan Henery, 28, and Beau Hansen, 30, both of Boise, have been charged with a hate crime. Olson says the assault was racially motivated. She says her office, the FBI, and the Boise Police Department have been partners in this case.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments last week on whether affirmative action in higher education should remain. The court has previously ruled to allow public universities to consider race as part of the admissions process. At universities in Idaho test scores and grade point averages are the main criteria used to admit students: race is not considered.