Racial Justice

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

 

Since election night almost two weeks ago, some folks in the national media are pointing to what they see as a surprising turn toward President Donald Trump among the Latino population. The “Latino vote” is a refrain used by political pundits, polling experts and journalists.

 

But what is the “Latino vote?” Is it even accurate to use this phrase? What are we missing when we lump so many diverse groups under one umbrella? 

 

Rachel Cohen/Boise State Public Radio

This interview originally aired Oct. 1, 2020.

During World War II, thousands of Japanese Americans were ordered by the U.S. government to be incarcerated in remote camps. The order, signed by President Franklin Roosevelt, was meant to prevent Japanese people on American soil from taking up arms and bringing the war inside U.S. borders. Today, that period is recognized as one of the most shameful in American history. 

walk sign, road sign
Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

The Idaho Walk Bike Alliance is hosting a virtual Transportation Conference on October 28-29 to educate transportation agencies, city staff, biking/walking advocates, elected officials, and residents on transportation issues in Idaho.

John Lucia / Flickr

As more people stay home during the pandemic, reports show domestic violence is on the rise. Now, a rift between some domestic violence coalitions and law enforcement is adding another challenge to getting survivors the help they need.


Courtesy of Keith Anderson

My name is Keith Anderson. I work for the TRIO Program at Boise State as an educational specialist.

MS507, Young Women’s Christian Association records / Idaho State Archives

Mone't Alberts

My name is Mone’t Alberts. I am a student at Boise State in Biomedical Tissue Engineering, and I grew up in Boise, Idaho.

I went to elementary, middle, high school and eventually college, all in Idaho. I am African-American and female and I did have a lot of experiences at a younger age that definitely made me feel awful.

Rachel Cohen/Boise State Public Radio

 

During World War II, thousands of Japanese Americans were ordered by the U.S. government to be incarcerated in remote camps. The order, signed by President Franklin Roosevelt, was meant to prevent Japanese people on American soil from taking up arms and bringing the war inside the United States borders. Today, that period is recognized as one of the most shameful in American history. 

Charles Sykes / Invision/AP

 

Latino USA is an award-winning public radio show led by journalist Maria Hinojosa, which is celebrating its 25th year as an hour-long program. Boise State Public Radio is proud to announce we’re adding Latino USA to our lineup. 

Otto Kitsinger / Idaho Statesman

 

A growing list of arts, history and culture institutions, including the Boise PhilharmonicIdaho Botanical GardenOpera Idaho and Treefort Music Fest, are committing to action steps within their own organizations as part of a greater community-wide effort to effect change to systemic racism.

Elaine Thompson / AP Images

 


Savannah Maher / Wyoming Public Media

A growing list of arts, history and culture institutions, including the Boise Philharmonic, Idaho Botanical Garden, Opera Idaho and Treefort Music Fest, are committing to action steps within their own organizations as part of a greater community-wide effort to effect change to systemic racism.

MS507, Young Women’s Christian Association records / Idaho State Archives

We’re excited to share the most recent episode of Boise State Public Radio's Wanna Know Idaho podcast. The podcast explores the curious elements of life in Idaho… with you, our listeners!

This month, we answer listener Debra Smith's question: “Did Idaho have any housing discrimination laws during the Jim Crow era?”

MS507, Young Women’s Christian Association records / Idaho State Archives

Up until her retirement a few months ago, Debra Smith taught high school English in Meridian. Every year, she had her 11th graders read "A Raisin in the Sun" by Lorraine Hansberry.

Keith Burrell / via Facebook

 

Even though the Black Lives Matter movement has dialed up the conversation across America about racial justice, more needs to be done to address systemic racism in local school districts across our nation. Idaho is no exception.

Tom Davenport / AP Images

 

Idaho Matters is continuing our deep dive into Idaho's racist history with Boise State University history professor Jill Gill. From Jim Crow-style practices in Boise from the 1940s and 1950s to the rise of the Aryan Nations in North Idaho in the 1980s and 1990s, we interrogate how our history of white supremacy manifested throughout the years — and what it means for today's push for a new reckoning of racial justice.  

 

Who Is Most At Risk For Police Violence?

Aug 6, 2020

This article is part of the Guns & America explainer series. You can read other entries here.

Over the past several years, the problem of police violence in the U.S. has garnered worldwide attention: the 2014 police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri; Freddie Gray in Baltimore, and Walter Scott in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015; and George Floyd in May 2020, among others.

Morgan Keating / City Club of Boise

In 1964, an assurance of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” was extended to Black America. 56 years have passed awaiting this to become a reality. Having allotted enough time for discussion,  it is time for palpable action. To be sure, housing, economics, jobs, education, and more play a significant role in the racism we see today. Today, millions of people are marching not because of those issues, but rather the issue of continued racist policing practices across the country.

 


DARIN OSWALD / IDAHO STATESMAN

 

 

DARIN OSWALD / IDAHO STATESMAN

 

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